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Mycorrhizal associations in ferns from Southern Ecuador


Lehnert, M; Kottke, I; Setaro, S; Pazmino, L F; Suárez, J P; Kessler, M (2009). Mycorrhizal associations in ferns from Southern Ecuador. American Fern Journal, 99(4):292-306.

Abstract

We conducted a survey on the mycorrhizal status of neotropical ferns, focusing on
previously neglected taxa. These include the filmy ferns (Hymenophyllaceae), grammitid ferns
(Polypodiaceae), and the genus Elaphoglossum (Dryopteridaceae). Samples were collected at
different sites in southern Ecuador, Prov. Loja, Morona-Santiago, and Zamora-Chinchipe. Among
the 85 investigated species (101 samples, 10 families), 19 were associated with arbuscular
mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and 36 were infected by dark septate endophytes (DSE), which are
identified as ascomycetes and here considered as a kind of mycorrhiza similar to the ericoid type.
The roots of 30 species (including all non-grammitid Polypodiaceae and half of the Elaphoglossum
species) were free of evident fungal infection. AMF were frequent in terrestrial species (29.10% of
species, or 48.49% of infected terrestrial samples). DSE prevailed in epiphytic species (58.62% of
species, or 96.15% of infected epiphytic samples) and were also common in terrestrial samples of
predominantly epiphytic species.

We conducted a survey on the mycorrhizal status of neotropical ferns, focusing on
previously neglected taxa. These include the filmy ferns (Hymenophyllaceae), grammitid ferns
(Polypodiaceae), and the genus Elaphoglossum (Dryopteridaceae). Samples were collected at
different sites in southern Ecuador, Prov. Loja, Morona-Santiago, and Zamora-Chinchipe. Among
the 85 investigated species (101 samples, 10 families), 19 were associated with arbuscular
mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and 36 were infected by dark septate endophytes (DSE), which are
identified as ascomycetes and here considered as a kind of mycorrhiza similar to the ericoid type.
The roots of 30 species (including all non-grammitid Polypodiaceae and half of the Elaphoglossum
species) were free of evident fungal infection. AMF were frequent in terrestrial species (29.10% of
species, or 48.49% of infected terrestrial samples). DSE prevailed in epiphytic species (58.62% of
species, or 96.15% of infected epiphytic samples) and were also common in terrestrial samples of
predominantly epiphytic species.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Systematic Botany and Botanical Gardens
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:07 Apr 2010 14:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:04
Publisher:American Fern Society, Inc.
ISSN:0002-7685
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1640/0002-8444-99.4.292
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-33281

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