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Survey on hearing aid outcome in Switzerland: associations with type of fitting (bilateral/unilateral), level of hearing aid signal processing, and hearing loss.


Bertoli, S; Bodmer, D; Probst, R (2010). Survey on hearing aid outcome in Switzerland: associations with type of fitting (bilateral/unilateral), level of hearing aid signal processing, and hearing loss. International Journal of Audiology, 49(5):333-46.

Abstract

The present investigation further analysed results of a previously reported survey with a large sample of hearing aid owners (Bertoli et al, 2009) to determine the individual and technological factors related to hearing aid outcome. In particular the associations of hearing loss, level of signal processing, and fitting type (bilateral versus unilateral fitting) with hearing aid use, satisfaction with and management of the aid were evaluated. A sub-group with symmetrical hearing loss was analysed (n = 6027). Regular use was more frequent in bilateral users and in owners of devices with more complex signal processing, but the strongest determinant of regular use was severity of hearing loss. Satisfaction was higher in the group wearing simple devices, while fitting type and degree of hearing loss had no influence on satisfaction rates. Moderate and severe hearing loss was associated more frequently with poor management of the aid than mild hearing loss. It was concluded that bilateral amplification and advanced signal processing features may contribute to successful hearing aid fitting, but the resulting differences must be considered to be relatively small.

Abstract

The present investigation further analysed results of a previously reported survey with a large sample of hearing aid owners (Bertoli et al, 2009) to determine the individual and technological factors related to hearing aid outcome. In particular the associations of hearing loss, level of signal processing, and fitting type (bilateral versus unilateral fitting) with hearing aid use, satisfaction with and management of the aid were evaluated. A sub-group with symmetrical hearing loss was analysed (n = 6027). Regular use was more frequent in bilateral users and in owners of devices with more complex signal processing, but the strongest determinant of regular use was severity of hearing loss. Satisfaction was higher in the group wearing simple devices, while fitting type and degree of hearing loss had no influence on satisfaction rates. Moderate and severe hearing loss was associated more frequently with poor management of the aid than mild hearing loss. It was concluded that bilateral amplification and advanced signal processing features may contribute to successful hearing aid fitting, but the resulting differences must be considered to be relatively small.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:21 Apr 2010 09:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:06
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1499-2027
Additional Information:This is a preprint of an article submitted for consideration in the International journal of audiology (2010)[copyright Taylor & Francis]. The International journal of audiology is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of this article;
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/14992020903473431
PubMed ID:20380609

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