UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The influence of a cochlear implant electrode on the mechanical function of the inner ear


Huber, A M; Sim, J H; Bonabi, S; Bodmer, D; Eiber, A (2010). The influence of a cochlear implant electrode on the mechanical function of the inner ear. Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 31(3):512-518.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: With the use of standard electrodes in cochlear implantation, residual acoustic hearing is markedly reduced or even lost. Possible reasons for this loss are direct implantation trauma to the inner ear, reaction of the cochlea triggered by the implantation, and change of cochlear mechanics due to the electrode. HYPOTHESIS: The introduction of a cochlear implant electrode does not alter the global mechanical behavior of the cochlear fluid as recorded at the stapes and the round window (RW) to the point of clinical relevance. OBJECTIVES: 1) To assess RW motion in response to acoustic stimulation in live human subjects for the first time and to compare findings with the published data on similar measurements in human temporal bones; 2) to test the hypothesis by comparing intraoperative measurements of the stapes with the RW before and after cochlear implant. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 18 adult patients with profound bilateral hearing loss. A scanning laser Doppler interferometer system measuring through the facial recess and a calibrated multi-sinewave acoustic stimulation tone in the ear canal were used. Changes in cochlear mechanics were assessed by comparing intraoperative measurements of stapes with RW membrane responses to acoustic signals before and after cochlear implantation. RESULTS: Vibration amplitudes and phase at the stapes and RW were not different in our patient group from published results from temporal bones. No significant changes in amplitude and phase were seen at the stapes and RW after cochlear implantation. CONCLUSION: It was possible to assess RW motion in live human subjects. Our results provide evidence that even a standard electrode does not alter cochlear mechanics to the point of clinical relevance.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: With the use of standard electrodes in cochlear implantation, residual acoustic hearing is markedly reduced or even lost. Possible reasons for this loss are direct implantation trauma to the inner ear, reaction of the cochlea triggered by the implantation, and change of cochlear mechanics due to the electrode. HYPOTHESIS: The introduction of a cochlear implant electrode does not alter the global mechanical behavior of the cochlear fluid as recorded at the stapes and the round window (RW) to the point of clinical relevance. OBJECTIVES: 1) To assess RW motion in response to acoustic stimulation in live human subjects for the first time and to compare findings with the published data on similar measurements in human temporal bones; 2) to test the hypothesis by comparing intraoperative measurements of the stapes with the RW before and after cochlear implant. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 18 adult patients with profound bilateral hearing loss. A scanning laser Doppler interferometer system measuring through the facial recess and a calibrated multi-sinewave acoustic stimulation tone in the ear canal were used. Changes in cochlear mechanics were assessed by comparing intraoperative measurements of stapes with RW membrane responses to acoustic signals before and after cochlear implantation. RESULTS: Vibration amplitudes and phase at the stapes and RW were not different in our patient group from published results from temporal bones. No significant changes in amplitude and phase were seen at the stapes and RW after cochlear implantation. CONCLUSION: It was possible to assess RW motion in live human subjects. Our results provide evidence that even a standard electrode does not alter cochlear mechanics to the point of clinical relevance.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:21 May 2010 13:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:08
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1531-7129
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e3181ca372b
PubMed ID:20061991

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations