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Inhibition of Aurora A in response to DNA damage


Krystyniak, A; Garcia-Echeverria, C; Prigent, C; Ferrari, S (2006). Inhibition of Aurora A in response to DNA damage. Oncogene, 25(3):338-348.

Abstract

Mitotic kinases are the ultimate target of pathways sensing genotoxic damage and impinging on the cell cycle machinery. Here, we provide evidence that Aurora A (AurA) was inhibited upon generation of double-strand breaks in DNA. We demonstrate that AurA was not downstream of CDK1 and that inhibition of AurA and CDK1 by DNA damage occurred independently. Using a cell line functionally deficient in Chk2, a selective Chk1 inhibitor and siRNA to Chk1, we show that DNA-damage signals were delivered to AurA through a Chk1-dependent pathway. With regard to the molecular mechanism of AurA inhibition, we found that the point mutation Ser(342)>Ala rendered AurA resistant to inhibition by DNA damage. By means of two distinct approaches we examined the impact of reconstitution of AurA activity in DNA-damaged cells: (i) transient expression of wild-type and Ser(342)>Ala mutant, but not kinase-dead, AurA led to bypass of the DNA damage block; (ii) direct transduction of highly active wt-AurA into G2 arrested cells precisely after induction of DNA damage resulted in mitotic entry. We show that the mechanism through which AurA allowed entry into mitosis was reactivation of CDK1, thus indicating that AurA plays a key role upstream of CDK1. A model depicting the possible role of AurA at the onset of mitosis and upon DNA damage is presented.

Mitotic kinases are the ultimate target of pathways sensing genotoxic damage and impinging on the cell cycle machinery. Here, we provide evidence that Aurora A (AurA) was inhibited upon generation of double-strand breaks in DNA. We demonstrate that AurA was not downstream of CDK1 and that inhibition of AurA and CDK1 by DNA damage occurred independently. Using a cell line functionally deficient in Chk2, a selective Chk1 inhibitor and siRNA to Chk1, we show that DNA-damage signals were delivered to AurA through a Chk1-dependent pathway. With regard to the molecular mechanism of AurA inhibition, we found that the point mutation Ser(342)>Ala rendered AurA resistant to inhibition by DNA damage. By means of two distinct approaches we examined the impact of reconstitution of AurA activity in DNA-damaged cells: (i) transient expression of wild-type and Ser(342)>Ala mutant, but not kinase-dead, AurA led to bypass of the DNA damage block; (ii) direct transduction of highly active wt-AurA into G2 arrested cells precisely after induction of DNA damage resulted in mitotic entry. We show that the mechanism through which AurA allowed entry into mitosis was reactivation of CDK1, thus indicating that AurA plays a key role upstream of CDK1. A model depicting the possible role of AurA at the onset of mitosis and upon DNA damage is presented.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 08:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:09
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0950-9232
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1209056
PubMed ID:16158051
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-34287

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