UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Crystal structure of a thwarted mismatch glycosylase DNA repair complex


Barrett, T E; Schärer, O D; Savva, R; Brown, T; Jiricny, J; Verdine, G L; Pearl, L H (1999). Crystal structure of a thwarted mismatch glycosylase DNA repair complex. EMBO Journal, 18(23):6599-6609.

Abstract

The bacterial mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (MUG) and eukaryotic thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) enzymes form a homologous family of DNA glycosylases that initiate base-excision repair of G:U/T mismatches. Despite low sequence homology, the MUG/TDG enzymes are structurally related to the uracil-DNA glycosylase enzymes, but have a very different mechanism for substrate recognition. We have now determined the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli MUG enzyme complexed with an oligonucleotide containing a non-hydrolysable deoxyuridine analogue mismatched with guanine, providing the first structure of an intact substrate-nucleotide productively bound to a hydrolytic DNA glycosylase. The structure of this complex explains the preference for G:U over G:T mispairs, and reveals an essentially non-specific pyrimidine-binding pocket that allows MUG/TDG enzymes to excise the alkylated base, 3, N(4)-ethenocytosine. Together with structures for the free enzyme and for an abasic-DNA product complex, the MUG-substrate analogue complex reveals the conformational changes accompanying the catalytic cycle of substrate binding, base excision and product release.

Abstract

The bacterial mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (MUG) and eukaryotic thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) enzymes form a homologous family of DNA glycosylases that initiate base-excision repair of G:U/T mismatches. Despite low sequence homology, the MUG/TDG enzymes are structurally related to the uracil-DNA glycosylase enzymes, but have a very different mechanism for substrate recognition. We have now determined the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli MUG enzyme complexed with an oligonucleotide containing a non-hydrolysable deoxyuridine analogue mismatched with guanine, providing the first structure of an intact substrate-nucleotide productively bound to a hydrolytic DNA glycosylase. The structure of this complex explains the preference for G:U over G:T mispairs, and reveals an essentially non-specific pyrimidine-binding pocket that allows MUG/TDG enzymes to excise the alkylated base, 3, N(4)-ethenocytosine. Together with structures for the free enzyme and for an abasic-DNA product complex, the MUG-substrate analogue complex reveals the conformational changes accompanying the catalytic cycle of substrate binding, base excision and product release.

Citations

100 citations in Web of Science®
101 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 09 Jul 2010
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1999
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 08:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:09
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0261-4189
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/emboj/18.23.6599
PubMed ID:10581234

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations