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Synthetic-echo time postprocessing technique for generating images with variable T2-weighted contrast: diagnosis of meniscal and cartilage abnormalities of the knee


Andreisek, G; White, L M; Theodoropoulos, J S; Naraghi, A; Young, N; Zhao, C Y; Mamisch, T C; Sussman, M S (2010). Synthetic-echo time postprocessing technique for generating images with variable T2-weighted contrast: diagnosis of meniscal and cartilage abnormalities of the knee. Radiology, 254(1):188-199.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and accuracy of a synthetic-echo time (TE) magnetic resonance (MR) postprocessing technique for the diagnostic evaluation of abnormalities of menisci and articular cartilage in the knee. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was approved by the institutional review board. Twenty-four patients (three women, 21 men; mean age, 44.8 years) gave informed written consent to prospectively undergo evaluation of their knees (10 left and 14 right knees) with standard sagittal intermediate-weighted (repetition time msec/TE msec, 2200/17) and fat-saturated T2-weighted (3600/88) fast spin-echo sequences. In addition, sagittal multiecho fast gradient-echo sequences were performed for the generation of synthetic-TE images with variable T2- or T2(*)-weighted contrast by using a newly developed synthetic-TE analysis tool that was incorporated directly into the picture archiving and communication system. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values for detection of lesions in menisci and articular cartilage were calculated by using findings at surgery as reference standard. RESULTS: The standard intermediate-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR sequences had overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 100% and 100%, 88% and 93%, and 95% and 95% for the diagnosis of tears of medial and lateral menisci, respectively, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 82%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for articular cartilage defects. Corresponding sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values for multiecho MR imaging with synthetic-TE MR image generation were 92% and 100%, 88% and 87%, and 90% and 90% for the diagnosis of tears of medial and lateral menisci, respectively, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 70%, 99%, and 95%, respectively, for articular cartilage defects. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of menisci and articular cartilage, images generated with the synthetic-TE technique are a potentially viable alternative to standard T2-weighted images obtained at different TEs. Furthermore, the synthetic-TE approach allowed assessment of abnormalities of menisci and articular cartilage with high sensitivity and specificity.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and accuracy of a synthetic-echo time (TE) magnetic resonance (MR) postprocessing technique for the diagnostic evaluation of abnormalities of menisci and articular cartilage in the knee. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was approved by the institutional review board. Twenty-four patients (three women, 21 men; mean age, 44.8 years) gave informed written consent to prospectively undergo evaluation of their knees (10 left and 14 right knees) with standard sagittal intermediate-weighted (repetition time msec/TE msec, 2200/17) and fat-saturated T2-weighted (3600/88) fast spin-echo sequences. In addition, sagittal multiecho fast gradient-echo sequences were performed for the generation of synthetic-TE images with variable T2- or T2(*)-weighted contrast by using a newly developed synthetic-TE analysis tool that was incorporated directly into the picture archiving and communication system. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values for detection of lesions in menisci and articular cartilage were calculated by using findings at surgery as reference standard. RESULTS: The standard intermediate-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR sequences had overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 100% and 100%, 88% and 93%, and 95% and 95% for the diagnosis of tears of medial and lateral menisci, respectively, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 82%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for articular cartilage defects. Corresponding sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values for multiecho MR imaging with synthetic-TE MR image generation were 92% and 100%, 88% and 87%, and 90% and 90% for the diagnosis of tears of medial and lateral menisci, respectively, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 70%, 99%, and 95%, respectively, for articular cartilage defects. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of menisci and articular cartilage, images generated with the synthetic-TE technique are a potentially viable alternative to standard T2-weighted images obtained at different TEs. Furthermore, the synthetic-TE approach allowed assessment of abnormalities of menisci and articular cartilage with high sensitivity and specificity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2010
Deposited On:11 Jun 2010 09:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:09
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2541090314
PubMed ID:20032152

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