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Slow oscillations in human non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram: effects of increased sleep pressure


Bersagliere, A; Achermann, P (2010). Slow oscillations in human non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram: effects of increased sleep pressure. Journal of Sleep Research, 19(1 Pt 2):228-237.

Abstract

Slow oscillations (< 1 Hz) in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) result from slow membrane potential fluctuations of cortical neurones, alternating between a depolarized up-state and a hyperpolarized down-state. They are thought to underlie the restorative function of sleep. We investigated the behaviour of slow oscillations in humans under increased sleep pressure to assess their contribution to sleep homeostasis. EEG recordings (C3A2) of baseline and recovery sleep after sleep deprivation (eight healthy males, mean age 23 years; 40 h of prolonged wakefulness) were analysed. Half-waves were defined as positive or negative deflections between consecutive zero crossings in the 0.5-2 Hz range of the band-pass filtered EEG. Increased sleep pressure resulted in a redistribution of half-waves between 0.5 and 2 Hz: the number of half-waves per minute was reduced below 0.9 Hz while it was increased above 1.2 Hz. EEG power was increased above 1 Hz. The increase in frequency was accompanied by increased slope of the half-waves and decreased number of multi-peak waves. In both baseline and recovery sleep, amplitude and slope were correlated highly over a broad frequency range and positive half-waves were characterized by a lower frequency than the negative ones, pointing to a longer duration of up- than down-states. We hypothesize that the higher frequency of slow oscillatory activity after prolonged wakefulness may relate to faster alternations between up- and down-states at the cellular level under increased sleep pressure. This study does not question slow-wave activity as a marker of sleep homeostasis, as the observed changes occurred within the same frequency range.

Slow oscillations (< 1 Hz) in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) result from slow membrane potential fluctuations of cortical neurones, alternating between a depolarized up-state and a hyperpolarized down-state. They are thought to underlie the restorative function of sleep. We investigated the behaviour of slow oscillations in humans under increased sleep pressure to assess their contribution to sleep homeostasis. EEG recordings (C3A2) of baseline and recovery sleep after sleep deprivation (eight healthy males, mean age 23 years; 40 h of prolonged wakefulness) were analysed. Half-waves were defined as positive or negative deflections between consecutive zero crossings in the 0.5-2 Hz range of the band-pass filtered EEG. Increased sleep pressure resulted in a redistribution of half-waves between 0.5 and 2 Hz: the number of half-waves per minute was reduced below 0.9 Hz while it was increased above 1.2 Hz. EEG power was increased above 1 Hz. The increase in frequency was accompanied by increased slope of the half-waves and decreased number of multi-peak waves. In both baseline and recovery sleep, amplitude and slope were correlated highly over a broad frequency range and positive half-waves were characterized by a lower frequency than the negative ones, pointing to a longer duration of up- than down-states. We hypothesize that the higher frequency of slow oscillatory activity after prolonged wakefulness may relate to faster alternations between up- and down-states at the cellular level under increased sleep pressure. This study does not question slow-wave activity as a marker of sleep homeostasis, as the observed changes occurred within the same frequency range.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2010
Deposited On:04 Jul 2010 14:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:10
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0962-1105
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2009.00775.x
PubMed ID:19845847
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-34733

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