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Personal and Situational Determinants of Multitasking at Work


König, C J; Oberacher, L; Kleinmann, Martin (2010). Personal and Situational Determinants of Multitasking at Work. Journal of Personnel Psychology, 9(2):99-103.

Abstract

Many people work on more than one task during a typical work hour, but despite its commonness, multitasking behavior has so far been ignored by researchers. This study is the first to explore predictors of the extent of multitasking behavior at work. Questionnaire data from 192 employees were analyzed. The findings showed that polychronicity (the preference to multitask) was the most important predictor, but impulsivity and work demands were also predictors. Surprisingly, neither cognitive interference (the proneness to engage in off-task cognitions) nor family demands predicted the extent of multitasking behavior. The implications of these findings for organizations are discussed.

Many people work on more than one task during a typical work hour, but despite its commonness, multitasking behavior has so far been ignored by researchers. This study is the first to explore predictors of the extent of multitasking behavior at work. Questionnaire data from 192 employees were analyzed. The findings showed that polychronicity (the preference to multitask) was the most important predictor, but impulsivity and work demands were also predictors. Surprisingly, neither cognitive interference (the proneness to engage in off-task cognitions) nor family demands predicted the extent of multitasking behavior. The implications of these findings for organizations are discussed.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:06 Jul 2010 12:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:11
Publisher:Hogrefe
ISSN:1866-5888
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/1866-5888/a000008
Official URL:http://www.psycontent.com/content/h42u7612860384k1/?p=415c558550a24239b16615079baf60e9&pi=4
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-34818

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