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Sleep disruption aggravates focal cerebral ischemia in the rat


Gao, B; Cam, E; Jaeger, H; Zunzunegui, C; Sarnthein, J; Bassetti, C L (2010). Sleep disruption aggravates focal cerebral ischemia in the rat. Sleep, 33(7):879-887.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep changes are frequent in stroke patients and predict a poor outcome. It remains unclear how sleep influences stroke evolution and recovery. We assessed effects of sleep disruption on brain damage and on the expression of axon sprouting genes after focal cerebral ischemia in rats. DESIGN: 12 h after ischemia induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, rats were subjected to sleep disruption including sleep deprivation for 12h (SDpv12h) and sleep disturbances (SDis) by SDpv12h for consecutive 3 days. Control groups included ischemia without SDpv12h or SDis, sham surgery plus SDis and sham surgery without SDis. Sleep changes were evaluated based on EEG and EMG recordings. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: SDpv12h increased the infarct volume by 40% (SDpv12h 82.8 +/- 10.9 vs. control 59.2 +/- 13.9 mm3, P = 0.008) and SDis by 76% (SDis 58.8 +/- 20.4 vs. control 33.8 +/- 6.3 mm3, P = 0.017). SDpv12h also increased the number of damaged cells, visualized by TUNEL staining, by 137% (SDpv12h 46.8 +/- 15 vs. control 19.7 +/- 7.7/mm2, P < 0.001) and SDis by 219% (SDis 32.9 +/- 13.2 vs. control 10.3 +/- 2.5/mm2, P = 0.002). In addition, SDis significantly elevated the expression of the axonal extension inhibitory molecule neurocan (SDis 14.3 +/- 0.4 vs. control 6.2 +/- 0.1-fold of change, P < 0.001) in the injured hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide the first direct evidence for a detrimental impact of sleep disruption on stroke evolution and suggest a potential role of sleep modulating treatments on stroke outcomes.

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep changes are frequent in stroke patients and predict a poor outcome. It remains unclear how sleep influences stroke evolution and recovery. We assessed effects of sleep disruption on brain damage and on the expression of axon sprouting genes after focal cerebral ischemia in rats. DESIGN: 12 h after ischemia induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, rats were subjected to sleep disruption including sleep deprivation for 12h (SDpv12h) and sleep disturbances (SDis) by SDpv12h for consecutive 3 days. Control groups included ischemia without SDpv12h or SDis, sham surgery plus SDis and sham surgery without SDis. Sleep changes were evaluated based on EEG and EMG recordings. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: SDpv12h increased the infarct volume by 40% (SDpv12h 82.8 +/- 10.9 vs. control 59.2 +/- 13.9 mm3, P = 0.008) and SDis by 76% (SDis 58.8 +/- 20.4 vs. control 33.8 +/- 6.3 mm3, P = 0.017). SDpv12h also increased the number of damaged cells, visualized by TUNEL staining, by 137% (SDpv12h 46.8 +/- 15 vs. control 19.7 +/- 7.7/mm2, P < 0.001) and SDis by 219% (SDis 32.9 +/- 13.2 vs. control 10.3 +/- 2.5/mm2, P = 0.002). In addition, SDis significantly elevated the expression of the axonal extension inhibitory molecule neurocan (SDis 14.3 +/- 0.4 vs. control 6.2 +/- 0.1-fold of change, P < 0.001) in the injured hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide the first direct evidence for a detrimental impact of sleep disruption on stroke evolution and suggest a potential role of sleep modulating treatments on stroke outcomes.

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26 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 July 2010
Deposited On:16 Jul 2010 14:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:11
Publisher:Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC
ISSN:0161-8105
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=27840
PubMed ID:20614848
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35015

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