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Role of the bile salt export pump, BSEP, in acquired forms of cholestasis


Stieger, B (2010). Role of the bile salt export pump, BSEP, in acquired forms of cholestasis. Drug Metabolism Reviews, 42(3):437-445.

Abstract

Generation of bile is a key function of the liver. Its impairment leads to accumulation of cytotoxic bile salts in hepatocytes and, consequently, to liver disease. The bile salt export pump, BSEP, is critically involved in the secretion of bile salts into bile. Its function can be disturbed or abolished by inherited mutations. This will lead to progressive intrahepatic cholestais and severe liver disease. In addition to mutations, BSEP can be inhibited by acquired factors, such as xenobiotics or drugs, aberrant bile salt metabolites, or pregnancy. This inhibition will lead to acquired cholestasis. Some drugs are now known to be competitive inhibitors of Bsep. In addition, a polymorphism in the gene coding for BSEP has been identified as a potential susceptibility factor for acquired cholestasis.

Generation of bile is a key function of the liver. Its impairment leads to accumulation of cytotoxic bile salts in hepatocytes and, consequently, to liver disease. The bile salt export pump, BSEP, is critically involved in the secretion of bile salts into bile. Its function can be disturbed or abolished by inherited mutations. This will lead to progressive intrahepatic cholestais and severe liver disease. In addition to mutations, BSEP can be inhibited by acquired factors, such as xenobiotics or drugs, aberrant bile salt metabolites, or pregnancy. This inhibition will lead to acquired cholestasis. Some drugs are now known to be competitive inhibitors of Bsep. In addition, a polymorphism in the gene coding for BSEP has been identified as a potential susceptibility factor for acquired cholestasis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:19 Jul 2010 08:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:12
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0360-2532
Publisher DOI:10.3109/03602530903492004
PubMed ID:20028269
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35096

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