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Excessive iron storage in captive omnivores? The case of the coati (Nasua spp.)


Clauss, Marcus; Hänichen, T; Hummel, J; Ricker, U; Block, K; Grest, P; Hatt, J M (2006). Excessive iron storage in captive omnivores? The case of the coati (Nasua spp.). In: Fidgett, A; Clauss, M; Eulenberger, K; Hatt, J M; Hume, I; Janssens, G; Nijboer, J. Zoo animal nutrition Vol. III. Fürth: Filander, 91-99.

Abstract

We collated necropsy reports for 13 coatis (Nasua spp.), revealing four cases of moderate and six cases of massive iron deposition in liver tissue. This survey corroborates an earlier report that noted a high frequency of iron deposits in coatis at necropsy. A comparison of the reported natural diet of coatis and the usually fed captive diets revealed that whereas vertebrate products (dog/cat food, prey items) represent the staple diet items for captive individuals, free-ranging coatis only rarely consume vertebrate prey; their natural diet is dominated by wild fruits and invertebrates. This discrepancy should be reflected in high levels of readily available heme iron in captive diets, with little or no heme iron in the natural diets. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that the use of vertebrate products in animals not adapted to such high levels of readily available heme iron could be a cause for dietary iron overload. Further studies on the relevance of excessive iron storage in omnivores/insectivores, and their etiopathology, are indicated.

We collated necropsy reports for 13 coatis (Nasua spp.), revealing four cases of moderate and six cases of massive iron deposition in liver tissue. This survey corroborates an earlier report that noted a high frequency of iron deposits in coatis at necropsy. A comparison of the reported natural diet of coatis and the usually fed captive diets revealed that whereas vertebrate products (dog/cat food, prey items) represent the staple diet items for captive individuals, free-ranging coatis only rarely consume vertebrate prey; their natural diet is dominated by wild fruits and invertebrates. This discrepancy should be reflected in high levels of readily available heme iron in captive diets, with little or no heme iron in the natural diets. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that the use of vertebrate products in animals not adapted to such high levels of readily available heme iron could be a cause for dietary iron overload. Further studies on the relevance of excessive iron storage in omnivores/insectivores, and their etiopathology, are indicated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:25 Mar 2009 14:52
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 13:36
Publisher:Filander
Series Name:Zoological Library
ISBN:978-3-930831-57-9
Related URLs:http://www.filander.de/ (Publisher)
http://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&mode=Advanced&vid=ZAD&vl%28186672378UI0%29=isbn&vl%281UI0%29=contains&vl%28freeText0%29=978-3-930831-57-9
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3511

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