UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The digestive physiology of colobine primates


Nijboer, J; Clauss, Marcus (2006). The digestive physiology of colobine primates. In: Nijboer, J. Fibre intake and faeces quality in leaf-eating primates. Ridderkerk, The Netherlands: Ridderprint, 9-28.

Abstract

Colobines are a group of primates from southeast Asia and Africa that feed, in nature, exclusively on leaves, fruits and seeds of trees, which contain high amounts of fibre and secondary plant compounds. Up to 50% of the protein of their natural food is unavailable.
The colobine stomach can be divided into the saccus gastricus, with or without a presaccus – both sites of bacterial fermentation -, and the tubus gatricus and pars pylorica in which enzymatic digestion takes is initiated. Bacterial fermentation also occurs in the capacious cecum and proximal colon digestion. The pH and volatile fatty acid content of the different sections of the gastrointestinal tract confirm this pattern of bacterial and enzymatic digestion. To date, no protozoa have been documented in colobine forestomachs although very long ingesta retention times have been measured in several studies in these animals. In general, the existing data is dominated by measurements on captive animals kept on diets that are not representative of the natural diet.
Structural and non-structural carbohydrates are important diet components and the diversion between the different pats can influence the microflora in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). A review is presented on the different carbohydrate fractions. Digestion efficiency of colobines is compared with animals in which the digestion takes place in the stomach, colon or caecum.
Natural diets contain higher amounts of acid detergent fibre levels (up to 52%) compared to diets in fed in captivity (9-15 %). When digestive efficiency was measured in captive animals fed considerable amounts of browse, with a high lignification of fibre and secondary plant compounds, the resulting values were lower than digestion coefficients measured in colobines fed artificial feeds only.
The apparent organic matter digestibility (aD OM) has been quantified by the following equation: aD OM = 88 – 0.89 crude fiber (% dry matter). Colobines are fibre fermenters, which is reflected in a moderate negative slope of the relationship which combines all available data on dietary fibre levels, measured as neutral detergent fibre, and dry matter digestibility.

Colobines are a group of primates from southeast Asia and Africa that feed, in nature, exclusively on leaves, fruits and seeds of trees, which contain high amounts of fibre and secondary plant compounds. Up to 50% of the protein of their natural food is unavailable.
The colobine stomach can be divided into the saccus gastricus, with or without a presaccus – both sites of bacterial fermentation -, and the tubus gatricus and pars pylorica in which enzymatic digestion takes is initiated. Bacterial fermentation also occurs in the capacious cecum and proximal colon digestion. The pH and volatile fatty acid content of the different sections of the gastrointestinal tract confirm this pattern of bacterial and enzymatic digestion. To date, no protozoa have been documented in colobine forestomachs although very long ingesta retention times have been measured in several studies in these animals. In general, the existing data is dominated by measurements on captive animals kept on diets that are not representative of the natural diet.
Structural and non-structural carbohydrates are important diet components and the diversion between the different pats can influence the microflora in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). A review is presented on the different carbohydrate fractions. Digestion efficiency of colobines is compared with animals in which the digestion takes place in the stomach, colon or caecum.
Natural diets contain higher amounts of acid detergent fibre levels (up to 52%) compared to diets in fed in captivity (9-15 %). When digestive efficiency was measured in captive animals fed considerable amounts of browse, with a high lignification of fibre and secondary plant compounds, the resulting values were lower than digestion coefficients measured in colobines fed artificial feeds only.
The apparent organic matter digestibility (aD OM) has been quantified by the following equation: aD OM = 88 – 0.89 crude fiber (% dry matter). Colobines are fibre fermenters, which is reflected in a moderate negative slope of the relationship which combines all available data on dietary fibre levels, measured as neutral detergent fibre, and dry matter digestibility.

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 26 Nov 2008
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:26 Nov 2008 11:50
Last Modified:07 Sep 2016 08:42
Publisher:Ridderprint
Official URL:http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/dissertations/2006-0609-200115/index.htm
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3520

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations