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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35211

Zeller, S L; Kalinina, O; Brunner, S; Keller, B; Schmid, B (2010). Transgene x environment interactions in genetically modified wheat. PLoS ONE, 5(7):e11405.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The introduction of transgenes into plants may cause unintended phenotypic effects which could have an impact on the plant itself and the environment. Little is published in the scientific literature about the interrelation of environmental factors and possible unintended effects in genetically modified (GM) plants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied transgenic bread wheat Triticum aestivum lines expressing the wheat Pm3b gene against the fungus powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici. Four independent offspring pairs, each consisting of a GM line and its corresponding non-GM control line, were grown under different soil nutrient conditions and with and without fungicide treatment in the glasshouse. Furthermore, we performed a field experiment with a similar design to validate our glasshouse results. The transgene increased the resistance to powdery mildew in all environments. However, GM plants reacted sensitive to fungicide spraying in the glasshouse. Without fungicide treatment, in the glasshouse GM lines had increased vegetative biomass and seed number and a twofold yield compared with control lines. In the field these results were reversed. Fertilization generally increased GM/control differences in the glasshouse but not in the field. Two of four GM lines showed up to 56% yield reduction and a 40-fold increase of infection with ergot disease Claviceps purpurea compared with their control lines in the field experiment; one GM line was very similar to its control. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that, depending on the insertion event, a particular transgene can have large effects on the entire phenotype of a plant and that these effects can sometimes be reversed when plants are moved from the glasshouse to the field. However, it remains unclear which mechanisms underlie these effects and how they may affect concepts in molecular plant breeding and plant evolutionary ecology.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Plant Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:12 July 2010
Deposited On:27 Jul 2010 06:54
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 19:17
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
Publisher DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0011405
PubMed ID:20635001
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 21
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Scopus®. Citation Count: 22

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