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Epilepsy is not caused by cysticercosis in The Gambia


Secka, A; Grimm, F; Victor, B; Marcotty, T; De Deken, R; Nyan, O; Herera, O; Van Marck, E; Geerts, S (2010). Epilepsy is not caused by cysticercosis in The Gambia. Tropical Medicine & International Health, 15(4):476-479.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether epilepsy is caused by Taenia solium cysticercosis in The Gambia. METHODS: Case-control study testing samples collected from 210 people with epilepsy and 420 matched controls by sex and age +/-5 years from 69 different places around the country during the period October 2008-March 2009. All serum samples were subjected to an antigen detection ELISA (Ag-ELISA) and electro-immunotransfer blot (EITB), and the seropositives were further CT-scanned to determine the presence of cysticerci in the brain. RESULTS: Although not significantly different (P = 0.668), circulating Taenia antigen was found by Ag-ELISA in 1.4% (95% CI: 0.3-4.1) of people with epilepsy and in 1.9% (95% CI: 0.8-3.7) of the controls. A non-significant (P = 0.4718) odds ratio of association 0.75 (95% CI: 0.13-3.15) between epilepsy and the presence of Taenia antigens was found. All 630 serum samples turned out seronegative by the EITB test. There were no intracranial cysts or cyst-like structures detected among the nine CT-scanned Ag-ELISA seropositives. CONCLUSION: Epilepsy appears not to be caused by cysticercosis in The Gambia.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether epilepsy is caused by Taenia solium cysticercosis in The Gambia. METHODS: Case-control study testing samples collected from 210 people with epilepsy and 420 matched controls by sex and age +/-5 years from 69 different places around the country during the period October 2008-March 2009. All serum samples were subjected to an antigen detection ELISA (Ag-ELISA) and electro-immunotransfer blot (EITB), and the seropositives were further CT-scanned to determine the presence of cysticerci in the brain. RESULTS: Although not significantly different (P = 0.668), circulating Taenia antigen was found by Ag-ELISA in 1.4% (95% CI: 0.3-4.1) of people with epilepsy and in 1.9% (95% CI: 0.8-3.7) of the controls. A non-significant (P = 0.4718) odds ratio of association 0.75 (95% CI: 0.13-3.15) between epilepsy and the presence of Taenia antigens was found. All 630 serum samples turned out seronegative by the EITB test. There were no intracranial cysts or cyst-like structures detected among the nine CT-scanned Ag-ELISA seropositives. CONCLUSION: Epilepsy appears not to be caused by cysticercosis in The Gambia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:28 Jul 2010 10:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1360-2276
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2010.02470.x
PubMed ID:20180937
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35231

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