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Bovine Fasciolose in der Schweiz: Bedeutung und Bekämpfung


Knubben-Schweizer, G; Deplazes, P; Torgerson, P R; Rapsch, C; Meli, M L; Braun, U (2010). Bovine Fasciolose in der Schweiz: Bedeutung und Bekämpfung. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 152(5):223-229.

Abstract

In Switzerland, bovine fasciolosis is an economically important but often overlooked disease of dairy cows. The intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Switzerland is Galba truncatula, an amphibious snail living in humid habitats which are infected by miracidia from recently hatched Fasciola eggs. The definitive hosts include cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and free-living ruminants. Infection of these hosts occur from metacercariae, usually encysted on vegetation. Infection risk depends on the location of the habitat on the farm. There is a lower risk for the intermediate host to become infected on pastures for young stock and dry cows than on pastures for dairy cows. This in turn results in a lower infection risk for young stock and dry cows than for dairy cows. When controlling the disease, epidemiologic factors such as treatment and pasture management strategies should be taken into account. If individual control measures are followed, infection pressure and prevalence in a herd can be significantly reduced. To support veterinarians and farmers in the control of fasciolosis, an interactive map showing potential risk areas for fasciolosis was created on the basis of geographical, meteorological, and biological data of the intermediate host and the free-living parasite stages.

In Switzerland, bovine fasciolosis is an economically important but often overlooked disease of dairy cows. The intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Switzerland is Galba truncatula, an amphibious snail living in humid habitats which are infected by miracidia from recently hatched Fasciola eggs. The definitive hosts include cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and free-living ruminants. Infection of these hosts occur from metacercariae, usually encysted on vegetation. Infection risk depends on the location of the habitat on the farm. There is a lower risk for the intermediate host to become infected on pastures for young stock and dry cows than on pastures for dairy cows. This in turn results in a lower infection risk for young stock and dry cows than for dairy cows. When controlling the disease, epidemiologic factors such as treatment and pasture management strategies should be taken into account. If individual control measures are followed, infection pressure and prevalence in a herd can be significantly reduced. To support veterinarians and farmers in the control of fasciolosis, an interactive map showing potential risk areas for fasciolosis was created on the basis of geographical, meteorological, and biological data of the intermediate host and the free-living parasite stages.

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8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Other titles:Bovine fasciolosis in Switzerland: relevance and control
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:German
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:29 Jul 2010 03:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:12
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0036-7281
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/0036-7281/a000053
PubMed ID:20464681
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35234

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