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Relative diagnostic value of ocular vestibular evoked potentials and the subjective visual vertical during tilt and eccentric rotation


Valko, Y; Hegemann, S C A; Weber, K P; Straumann, D; Bockisch, C J (2011). Relative diagnostic value of ocular vestibular evoked potentials and the subjective visual vertical during tilt and eccentric rotation. Clinical Neurophysiology, 122(2):398-404.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We compared vibration-induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) with the visual vertical during whole-body roll tilt and eccentric rotation in healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular loss, to determine which test was most sensitive in discriminating impaired utricle function. METHODS: OVEMPs and the visual vertical were measured in 11 patients and 11 healthy subjects. Visual vertical was measured during roll tilts between -9.6 degrees and 9.6 degrees , and during rotation at 400 degrees /s with the head upright and the vertical rotation axis located between +/-3.5cm from the head center. RESULTS: OVEMPs in patients were strikingly asymmetric, whereas they were approximately symmetric in healthy subjects. Patients showed impaired visual vertical gain during eccentric rotation and increased errors for both roll tilt and eccentric rotation tests. OVEMPs were superior at discriminating between patients and healthy subjects, although eccentric rotation performed nearly as well. CONCLUSIONS: OVEMPs provide a powerful test for discriminating between healthy subjects and patients with chronic unilateral vestibular loss, and testing the visual vertical testing during eccentric rotation was superior to testing during whole-body roll tilt. SIGNIFICANCE: OVEMPs are easier to administer, less demanding on patients, and in general are more effective at identifying chronic unilateral vestibular loss than visual vertical measurements.

OBJECTIVE: We compared vibration-induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) with the visual vertical during whole-body roll tilt and eccentric rotation in healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular loss, to determine which test was most sensitive in discriminating impaired utricle function. METHODS: OVEMPs and the visual vertical were measured in 11 patients and 11 healthy subjects. Visual vertical was measured during roll tilts between -9.6 degrees and 9.6 degrees , and during rotation at 400 degrees /s with the head upright and the vertical rotation axis located between +/-3.5cm from the head center. RESULTS: OVEMPs in patients were strikingly asymmetric, whereas they were approximately symmetric in healthy subjects. Patients showed impaired visual vertical gain during eccentric rotation and increased errors for both roll tilt and eccentric rotation tests. OVEMPs were superior at discriminating between patients and healthy subjects, although eccentric rotation performed nearly as well. CONCLUSIONS: OVEMPs provide a powerful test for discriminating between healthy subjects and patients with chronic unilateral vestibular loss, and testing the visual vertical testing during eccentric rotation was superior to testing during whole-body roll tilt. SIGNIFICANCE: OVEMPs are easier to administer, less demanding on patients, and in general are more effective at identifying chronic unilateral vestibular loss than visual vertical measurements.

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9 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Aug 2010 14:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.clinph.2010.06.023
PubMed ID:20663711
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35585

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