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Salivary cortisol concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with hypercortisolism - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Wenger-Riggenbach, B; Boretti, F S; Quante, S; Schellenberg, S; Reusch, C E; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S (2010). Salivary cortisol concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with hypercortisolism. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 24(3):551-556.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Measurement of salivary cortisol is a useful diagnostic test for hypercortisolism (HC) in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether measurement of salivary cortisol concentration is a practical alternative to plasma cortisol to diagnose HC, to validate the use of salivary cortisol, and to examine the effect of time of day and sampling location on salivary cortisol. ANIMALS: Thirty healthy dogs and 6 dogs with HC. METHODS: Prospective, observational clinical trial including healthy volunteer dogs and dogs newly diagnosed with HC. Salivary and plasma cortisol concentrations were measured with an immunoassay analyzer. Intra- and interassay variability, linearity, and correlation between salivary and plasma cortisol concentrations were determined. RESULTS: The required 300 microL of saliva could not be obtained in 88/326 samples from healthy dogs and in 15/30 samples from dogs with HC. The intra-assay variability for measurement of salivary cortisol was 5-17.7%, the interassay variability 8.5 and 17.3%, and the observed to expected ratio 89-125%. The correlation (r) between salivary and plasma cortisol was 0.98. The time of day and location of collection did not affect salivary cortisol concentrations. Dogs with HC had significantly higher salivary cortisol values than healthy dogs (10.2 +/- 7.3 nmol/L versus 1.54 +/- 0.97 nmol/L; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: The ROCHE Elecsys immunoassay analyzer correctly measured salivary cortisol in dogs. However, a broad clinical application of the method seems limited, because of the large sample volume required.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Measurement of salivary cortisol is a useful diagnostic test for hypercortisolism (HC) in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether measurement of salivary cortisol concentration is a practical alternative to plasma cortisol to diagnose HC, to validate the use of salivary cortisol, and to examine the effect of time of day and sampling location on salivary cortisol. ANIMALS: Thirty healthy dogs and 6 dogs with HC. METHODS: Prospective, observational clinical trial including healthy volunteer dogs and dogs newly diagnosed with HC. Salivary and plasma cortisol concentrations were measured with an immunoassay analyzer. Intra- and interassay variability, linearity, and correlation between salivary and plasma cortisol concentrations were determined. RESULTS: The required 300 microL of saliva could not be obtained in 88/326 samples from healthy dogs and in 15/30 samples from dogs with HC. The intra-assay variability for measurement of salivary cortisol was 5-17.7%, the interassay variability 8.5 and 17.3%, and the observed to expected ratio 89-125%. The correlation (r) between salivary and plasma cortisol was 0.98. The time of day and location of collection did not affect salivary cortisol concentrations. Dogs with HC had significantly higher salivary cortisol values than healthy dogs (10.2 +/- 7.3 nmol/L versus 1.54 +/- 0.97 nmol/L; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: The ROCHE Elecsys immunoassay analyzer correctly measured salivary cortisol in dogs. However, a broad clinical application of the method seems limited, because of the large sample volume required.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:04 Nov 2010 14:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0891-6640
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2010.0494.x
PubMed ID:20384959

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