UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Modulation of spinal reflex by assisted locomotion in humans with chronic complete spinal cord injury


Bolliger, M; Trepp, A; Zörner, B; Dietz, V (2010). Modulation of spinal reflex by assisted locomotion in humans with chronic complete spinal cord injury. Clinical Neurophysiology, 121(12):2152-2158.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In healthy subjects, spinal reflexes (SR) evoked by non-noxious tibial nerve stimulation consist of an early (60-120ms latency) and an occasional late-appearing (120-450ms latency) component in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior. In chronic (>1year) complete spinal cord injured (cSCI) subjects early components are small or lacking while late components are dominant. Here we report on the modulation of SR by assisted locomotion in healthy and chronic motor cSCI subjects. METHODS: SR was evoked by tibial nerve stimulation at the terminal stance phase during assisted locomotion and was compared to SR recorded during upright stance. RESULTS: In chronic cSCI subjects only a late SR component was consistently present during upright stance. However during assisted locomotion, an early SR component appeared, while amplitude of the late SR component became small. In contrast, in healthy subjects the early SR component dominated in all conditions, but a small late component appeared during assisted locomotion. CONCLUSION: A more balanced activity of early and late SR components occurred in both subject groups if an appropriate proprioceptive input was provided. SIGNIFICANCE: Early and late SR components are assumed to reflect the activity of separate neuronal circuits, which are associated with the locomotor circuitry possibly by shaping the pattern.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In healthy subjects, spinal reflexes (SR) evoked by non-noxious tibial nerve stimulation consist of an early (60-120ms latency) and an occasional late-appearing (120-450ms latency) component in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior. In chronic (>1year) complete spinal cord injured (cSCI) subjects early components are small or lacking while late components are dominant. Here we report on the modulation of SR by assisted locomotion in healthy and chronic motor cSCI subjects. METHODS: SR was evoked by tibial nerve stimulation at the terminal stance phase during assisted locomotion and was compared to SR recorded during upright stance. RESULTS: In chronic cSCI subjects only a late SR component was consistently present during upright stance. However during assisted locomotion, an early SR component appeared, while amplitude of the late SR component became small. In contrast, in healthy subjects the early SR component dominated in all conditions, but a small late component appeared during assisted locomotion. CONCLUSION: A more balanced activity of early and late SR components occurred in both subject groups if an appropriate proprioceptive input was provided. SIGNIFICANCE: Early and late SR components are assumed to reflect the activity of separate neuronal circuits, which are associated with the locomotor circuitry possibly by shaping the pattern.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 04 Nov 2010
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2010
Deposited On:04 Nov 2010 13:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2010.05.018
PubMed ID:20554473

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 434kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations