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NaPi-IIa interacting proteins and regulation of renal reabsorption of phosphate


Hernando, N; Gisler, S M; Reining, S C; Déliot, N; Capuano, P; Biber, J; Murer, H (2010). NaPi-IIa interacting proteins and regulation of renal reabsorption of phosphate. Urological Research, 38(4):271-276.

Abstract

Control of phosphate (P(i)) homeostasis is essential for many biologic functions and inappropriate low levels of P(i) in plasma have been suggested to associate with several pathological states, including renal stone formation and stone recurrence. P(i) homeostasis is achieved mainly by adjusting the renal reabsorption of P(i) to the body's requirements. This task is performed to a major extent by the Na/Pi cotransporter NaPi-IIa that is specifically expressed in the brush border membrane of renal proximal tubules. While the presence of tight junctions in epithelial cells prevents the diffusion and mixing of the apical and basolateral components, the location of a protein within a particular membrane subdomain (i.e., the presence of NaPi-IIa at the tip of the apical microvilli) often requires its association with scaffolding elements which directly or indirectly connect the protein with the underlying cellular cytoskeleton. NaPi-IIa interacts with the four members of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor family as well as with the GABA(A)-receptor associated protein . Here we will discuss the most relevant findings regarding the role of these proteins on the expression and regulation of the cotransporter, as well as the impact that their absence has in P(i) homeostasis.

Control of phosphate (P(i)) homeostasis is essential for many biologic functions and inappropriate low levels of P(i) in plasma have been suggested to associate with several pathological states, including renal stone formation and stone recurrence. P(i) homeostasis is achieved mainly by adjusting the renal reabsorption of P(i) to the body's requirements. This task is performed to a major extent by the Na/Pi cotransporter NaPi-IIa that is specifically expressed in the brush border membrane of renal proximal tubules. While the presence of tight junctions in epithelial cells prevents the diffusion and mixing of the apical and basolateral components, the location of a protein within a particular membrane subdomain (i.e., the presence of NaPi-IIa at the tip of the apical microvilli) often requires its association with scaffolding elements which directly or indirectly connect the protein with the underlying cellular cytoskeleton. NaPi-IIa interacts with the four members of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor family as well as with the GABA(A)-receptor associated protein . Here we will discuss the most relevant findings regarding the role of these proteins on the expression and regulation of the cotransporter, as well as the impact that their absence has in P(i) homeostasis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:05 Nov 2010 08:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0300-5623
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00240-010-0304-3
PubMed ID:20665015
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35762

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