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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-35789

La Marca, R; Waldvogel, P; Thörn, H; Tripod, M; Wirtz, P H; Pruessner, J C; Ehlert, U (2011). Association between Cold Face Test-induced vagal inhibition and cortisol response to acute stress. Psychophysiology, 48(3):420-429.

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Abstract

Low vagal function is related to several disorders. One possible underlying mechanism linking the vagus nerve and disorders is the HPA axis. Thirty-three healthy male subjects participated in a stress task, while heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), salivary cortisol, and mood were assessed. Vagal function was determined using baseline, stress-induced inhibition, and Cold Face Test (CFT)-induced stimulation. The stress task induced a significant increase in cortisol and HR, a decrease in RSA, and a worsening of mood. A linear regression model with the time from CFT onset until maximum bradycardia as the independent variable explained 17.9% of the total variance in cortisol in response to the stressor (mood: 36.5%). The results indicate that a faster CFT response is associated with reduced cortisol increase and enhanced mood after acute stress. Our data support an inverse relationship between vagal function and the HPA axis.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
DDC:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:02 Nov 2010 12:33
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 19:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0048-5772
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01078.x
PubMed ID:20667035
Citations:Web of Science®
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