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Effects of recombinant humant erythropoietin in normal humans


Lundby, C; Olsen, N V (2011). Effects of recombinant humant erythropoietin in normal humans. Journal of Physiology, 589(6):1265-1271.

Abstract

This review describes some of the physiological effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) in healthy humans. At the blood level EPO increases the arterial O2 content not only by increasing red blood cell volume, but also by an equally important decrease in plasma volume. Well before that, EPO causes a prompt decrease in plasma levels of renin and aldosterone. Renal clearance studies suggest that EPO decreases renal proximal tubular reabsorption rate leading to activation of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism and a fall in glomerular filtration rate. Thus, treatment with EPO may result in suppression of endogenous EPO production through a decrease in intrarenal oxygen consumption. EPO elevates the arterial blood pressure even in healthy subjects. The receptor for EPO is present in many tissues. However, the functional effects of EPO in the skeletal muscle seem limited, and although it has been speculated that non-erythropoietic effects of EPO (angiogenesis, shift in muscle fibre types, cognitive effects) may be responsible for the increase in exercise performance, this has not been confirmed. EPO induced haemodynamic effects call for careful monitoring during the administration period. The metabolic, hormonal and renal effects of EPO does not seem to range beyond physiological acceptable limits and are reversible. Taken together, EPO seems safe to use for experimental purposes in healthy volunteers.

This review describes some of the physiological effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) in healthy humans. At the blood level EPO increases the arterial O2 content not only by increasing red blood cell volume, but also by an equally important decrease in plasma volume. Well before that, EPO causes a prompt decrease in plasma levels of renin and aldosterone. Renal clearance studies suggest that EPO decreases renal proximal tubular reabsorption rate leading to activation of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism and a fall in glomerular filtration rate. Thus, treatment with EPO may result in suppression of endogenous EPO production through a decrease in intrarenal oxygen consumption. EPO elevates the arterial blood pressure even in healthy subjects. The receptor for EPO is present in many tissues. However, the functional effects of EPO in the skeletal muscle seem limited, and although it has been speculated that non-erythropoietic effects of EPO (angiogenesis, shift in muscle fibre types, cognitive effects) may be responsible for the increase in exercise performance, this has not been confirmed. EPO induced haemodynamic effects call for careful monitoring during the administration period. The metabolic, hormonal and renal effects of EPO does not seem to range beyond physiological acceptable limits and are reversible. Taken together, EPO seems safe to use for experimental purposes in healthy volunteers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:12 Nov 2010 15:06
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:15
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3751
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com and www.jphysiol.org
Publisher DOI:10.1113/jphysiol.2010.195917
PubMed ID:20807784
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36082

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