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Can the job demand control model explain back and neck pain? Cross-sectional study in a representative sample of Swiss working population


Canjuga, M; Läubli, T; Bauer, G (2010). Can the job demand control model explain back and neck pain? Cross-sectional study in a representative sample of Swiss working population. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 40(6):663-668.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was the examination of the Job Demand Control model in relation to self-reported work-related back and neck pain in a representative sample (n = 1040) of the Swiss working population. The effects of the main dimensions psychological and physical demands, job control and social support, but also their interaction were investigated for neck and back pain separately.

After factor and descriptive analyses, binary logistic regression was performed, controlling for age, sex and education.

This study found partial support for the Job Demand Control model. The findings showed some support for the strain hypothesis, but mainly that physically or psychologically demanding jobs were associated with a higher prevalence of neck and back pain. Job demands, especially the physical kind, had the most powerful effect. None of the interaction terms showed a significant effect.

The aim of the present study was the examination of the Job Demand Control model in relation to self-reported work-related back and neck pain in a representative sample (n = 1040) of the Swiss working population. The effects of the main dimensions psychological and physical demands, job control and social support, but also their interaction were investigated for neck and back pain separately.

After factor and descriptive analyses, binary logistic regression was performed, controlling for age, sex and education.

This study found partial support for the Job Demand Control model. The findings showed some support for the strain hypothesis, but mainly that physically or psychologically demanding jobs were associated with a higher prevalence of neck and back pain. Job demands, especially the physical kind, had the most powerful effect. None of the interaction terms showed a significant effect.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:27 Dec 2010 10:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0169-8141
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ergon.2010.08.003
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36113

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