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Jet ventilation for surgical interventions in the upper airway


Biro, P (2010). Jet ventilation for surgical interventions in the upper airway. Anesthesiology Clinics, 28(3):397-409.

Abstract

The clinical applications of jet ventilation (JV) in ear, nose, and throat surgery can be best understood by the characteristics that distinguish this form of ventilation from conventional positive pressure ventilation. By definition, JV is based on the application of gas portions under high pressure through an unblocked catheter into the airway, which is open to the ambient air. Beneficial opportunities arise in JV, which otherwise are not available in regular ventilation.

The clinical applications of jet ventilation (JV) in ear, nose, and throat surgery can be best understood by the characteristics that distinguish this form of ventilation from conventional positive pressure ventilation. By definition, JV is based on the application of gas portions under high pressure through an unblocked catheter into the airway, which is open to the ambient air. Beneficial opportunities arise in JV, which otherwise are not available in regular ventilation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Review
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:15 Nov 2010 13:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1932-2275
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.anclin.2010.07.001
PubMed ID:20850073
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36215

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