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Gender differences in vocational interests and their stability across different assessment methods


Proyer, Rene T; Häusler, J (2007). Gender differences in vocational interests and their stability across different assessment methods. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 66(4):243-247.

Abstract

In studies on gender differences with respect to Holland's (1997) vocational interests, men often score higher on Realistic (and sometimes also on Investigative and Enterprising) interests, and women score higher on Social and Artistic interests. In research and practice, vocational interests are almost exclusively assessed by means of questionnaires. The aim of this study was to examine whether these results are also stable across assessment methods. Thus, a questionnaire and a nonverbal interest inventory were administered to a sample of N = 448 participants. Results were in the expected direction for both inventories, men scoring higher on Realistic interests and women scoring higher on Artistic and Social interests. However, the structure of interests varied between men and women. The structural assumptions of Holland's theory fit the data for men better than the data for women. Thus, mean-level gender differences should be interpreted conservatively.

In studies on gender differences with respect to Holland's (1997) vocational interests, men often score higher on Realistic (and sometimes also on Investigative and Enterprising) interests, and women score higher on Social and Artistic interests. In research and practice, vocational interests are almost exclusively assessed by means of questionnaires. The aim of this study was to examine whether these results are also stable across assessment methods. Thus, a questionnaire and a nonverbal interest inventory were administered to a sample of N = 448 participants. Results were in the expected direction for both inventories, men scoring higher on Realistic interests and women scoring higher on Artistic and Social interests. However, the structure of interests varied between men and women. The structural assumptions of Holland's theory fit the data for men better than the data for women. Thus, mean-level gender differences should be interpreted conservatively.

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8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:vocational interests, gender differences, RIASEC
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:19 Mar 2009 15:04
Last Modified:09 Jun 2016 09:20
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1421-0185
Publisher DOI:10.1024/1421-0185.66.4.243
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3640

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