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Strengths of character, orientations to happiness, and life satisfaction


Peterson, C; Ruch, Willibald; Beermann, Ursula; Park, N; Seligman, M E P (2007). Strengths of character, orientations to happiness, and life satisfaction. Journal of Positive Psychology, 2(3):149-156.

Abstract

Why are certain character strengths more associated with life satisfaction than others? A sample of U.S. adults (N = 12,439) completed on-line surveys in English measuring character strengths, orientations to happiness (engagement, pleasure, and meaning), and life satisfaction, and a sample of Swiss adults (N = 445) completed paper-and-pencil versions of the same surveys in German. In both samples, the character strengths most highly linked to life satisfaction included love, hope, curiosity, and zest. Gratitude was among the most robust predictors of life satisfaction in the U.S. sample, whereas perseverance was among the most robust predictors in the Swiss sample. In both samples, the strengths of character most associated with life
satisfaction were associated with orientations to pleasure, to engagement, and to meaning, implying that the most fulfilling character strengths are those that make possible a full life.

Why are certain character strengths more associated with life satisfaction than others? A sample of U.S. adults (N = 12,439) completed on-line surveys in English measuring character strengths, orientations to happiness (engagement, pleasure, and meaning), and life satisfaction, and a sample of Swiss adults (N = 445) completed paper-and-pencil versions of the same surveys in German. In both samples, the character strengths most highly linked to life satisfaction included love, hope, curiosity, and zest. Gratitude was among the most robust predictors of life satisfaction in the U.S. sample, whereas perseverance was among the most robust predictors in the Swiss sample. In both samples, the strengths of character most associated with life
satisfaction were associated with orientations to pleasure, to engagement, and to meaning, implying that the most fulfilling character strengths are those that make possible a full life.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:July 2007
Deposited On:22 Mar 2009 18:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:27
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1743-9760
Additional Information:This is an electronic version of an article published in The Journal of Positive Psychology. The Journal of Positive Psychology is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t724921263~link=cover
Publisher DOI:10.1080/17439760701228938
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3647

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