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Attitudes towards long-acting depot antipsychotics: A survey of patients, relatives and psychiatrists


Jäger, M; Rössler, W (2010). Attitudes towards long-acting depot antipsychotics: A survey of patients, relatives and psychiatrists. Psychiatry Research, 175(1-2):58-62.

Abstract

In many countries fewer than 20% of individuals with schizophrenia receive depot antipsychotic medication. Frequently stated reasons are psychiatrist's, patient's and relative's objections to depot treatment. This is the first study that directly compares the attitudes to depot antipsychotics of psychiatrists, patients and relatives. A semi-structured questionnaire about their attitudes towards depot antipsychotics was completed by 255 participants (83 patients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorder, 81 psychiatrists in private practice and 91 relatives, not directly related to the patients). Patients were more negative towards depot injections than psychiatrists and relatives. They particularly fear to be constricted in their autonomy when treated with depot antipsychotics and that injections might be painful. About 67% of all patients in our sample did not receive information about depot antipsychotics from their psychiatrist. Less than 10% of psychiatrists offer depot treatment after a first psychotic episode. Psychiatrists use depot antipsychotics in a conservative way, although they attribute positive traits to the method. Patients' negative attitudes might relate to the low level of information. To enhance the use of depot antipsychotics, information practices of psychiatrists should be improved. Patients should be informed about different forms of treatment during early stages of the illness.

In many countries fewer than 20% of individuals with schizophrenia receive depot antipsychotic medication. Frequently stated reasons are psychiatrist's, patient's and relative's objections to depot treatment. This is the first study that directly compares the attitudes to depot antipsychotics of psychiatrists, patients and relatives. A semi-structured questionnaire about their attitudes towards depot antipsychotics was completed by 255 participants (83 patients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorder, 81 psychiatrists in private practice and 91 relatives, not directly related to the patients). Patients were more negative towards depot injections than psychiatrists and relatives. They particularly fear to be constricted in their autonomy when treated with depot antipsychotics and that injections might be painful. About 67% of all patients in our sample did not receive information about depot antipsychotics from their psychiatrist. Less than 10% of psychiatrists offer depot treatment after a first psychotic episode. Psychiatrists use depot antipsychotics in a conservative way, although they attribute positive traits to the method. Patients' negative attitudes might relate to the low level of information. To enhance the use of depot antipsychotics, information practices of psychiatrists should be improved. Patients should be informed about different forms of treatment during early stages of the illness.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:07 Dec 2010 14:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:17
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2008.11.003
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36473

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