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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-366

Meier, O; Gastaldelli, M; Boucke, K; Hemmi, S; Greber, U F (2005). Early steps of clathrin-mediated endocytosis involved in phagosomal escape of Fcgamma receptor-targeted adenovirus. Journal of Virology, 79(4):2604-2613.

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Abstract

Adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 enter epithelial cells via the coxsackievirus B Ad receptor (CAR) and alpha(v) integrin coreceptors. In the absence of CAR, they can be directed to the Fcgamma receptor 1 of hematopoietic cells by an adaptor comprising the extracellular CAR domain and the Fc portion of a human immunoglobulin G (CARex-Fc). This gives rise to Ad aggregates and single particles which together enhance gene delivery up to 250-fold compared to adaptor-less viruses. A small interfering RNA knockdown of the clathrin heavy chain and quantitative electron microscopy of hematopoietic leukemia cells showed that the majority of Ads were phagocytosed as clusters of 1 to 3 microm in diameter and that about 10% of the particles entered cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin knockdown did not affect phagocytosis but, surprisingly, inhibited viral escape from phagosomes. Similarly, blocking an early stage of clathrin-coated pit assembly inhibited phagosomal escape and infection but not aggregate uptake, unlike blocking of a late stage of clathrin-coated pit formation. We propose a cooperative interaction of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis triggering phagosomal lysis and infection.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:01 February 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 13:14
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 01:20
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0022-538X
Publisher DOI:10.1128/JVI.79.4.2604-2613.2005
PubMed ID:15681460
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 18
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