UZH-Logo

A survey of street children in northern Tanzania: how abuse or support factors may influence migration to the street


McAlpine, K; Henley, R; Müller, M; Vetter, S (2010). A survey of street children in northern Tanzania: how abuse or support factors may influence migration to the street. Community Mental Health Journal, 46(1):26-32.

Abstract

In October 2006, a survey was undertaken of youth "on the streets" in the Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions of Tanzania (n = 1,923). The question of interest was if street children who live on streets full-time differ concerning reports of abuse and support, compared to reports of children who are only part-time on the streets, and to children who don't self-identify as "street children" at all. Results show full-time street children reporting significantly more abuse than part-time counterparts, or children who were not street children (mean difference = -1.44, P < .001). Concerning support scores, non-street children and part-time street children reported significantly more support from their family than full-time street children (mean difference = 1.70, P < .001). This information identifies possible reasons why vulnerable children migrate to live on the streets in the urban areas, and contributes to the limited literature and data on this subject.

In October 2006, a survey was undertaken of youth "on the streets" in the Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions of Tanzania (n = 1,923). The question of interest was if street children who live on streets full-time differ concerning reports of abuse and support, compared to reports of children who are only part-time on the streets, and to children who don't self-identify as "street children" at all. Results show full-time street children reporting significantly more abuse than part-time counterparts, or children who were not street children (mean difference = -1.44, P < .001). Concerning support scores, non-street children and part-time street children reported significantly more support from their family than full-time street children (mean difference = 1.70, P < .001). This information identifies possible reasons why vulnerable children migrate to live on the streets in the urban areas, and contributes to the limited literature and data on this subject.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 16 Dec 2010
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:16 Dec 2010 09:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:17
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0010-3853
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10597-009-9196-5
PubMed ID:19415490
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36678

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 175kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations