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Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome: reappraisal of the diagnostic criteria


Sukhudyan, B; Jaladyan, V; Melikyan, G; Schlump, J U; Boltshauser, E; Poretti, A (2010). Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome: reappraisal of the diagnostic criteria. European Journal of Pediatrics, 169(12):1523-1528.

Abstract

Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome (GLHS) is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed condition. So far, 21 patients have been reported and all of them were sporadic observations. We report six additional patients. The hallmark triad of GLHS, also named cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia, consists of rhombencephalosynapsis, trigeminal anesthesia (often giving rise to corneal opacities), and bilateral parietal or parieto-occipital alopecia. Our patients had rhombencephalosynapsis and alopecia, but none had trigeminal dysfunction. In this respect, the term cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia is potentially misleading. In conclusion, only rhombencephalosynapsis and alopecia are consistently present in GLHS and are required diagnostic criteria, while trigeminal anesthesia, dysmorphic features, and ataxia are inconsistent findings. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose GLHS, particularly as alopecia tends to be hidden by surrounding scalp hair.

Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome (GLHS) is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed condition. So far, 21 patients have been reported and all of them were sporadic observations. We report six additional patients. The hallmark triad of GLHS, also named cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia, consists of rhombencephalosynapsis, trigeminal anesthesia (often giving rise to corneal opacities), and bilateral parietal or parieto-occipital alopecia. Our patients had rhombencephalosynapsis and alopecia, but none had trigeminal dysfunction. In this respect, the term cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia is potentially misleading. In conclusion, only rhombencephalosynapsis and alopecia are consistently present in GLHS and are required diagnostic criteria, while trigeminal anesthesia, dysmorphic features, and ataxia are inconsistent findings. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose GLHS, particularly as alopecia tends to be hidden by surrounding scalp hair.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:17 Dec 2010 12:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:18
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-6199
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00431-010-1259-7
PubMed ID:20652311
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-36769

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