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Use of local cues in the night-time navigation of the wandering desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae, Sparassidae)


Nørgaard, T; Henschel, J R; Wehner, R (2007). Use of local cues in the night-time navigation of the wandering desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae, Sparassidae). Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 193(2):217-222.

Abstract

Adult male Leucorchestris arenicola can walk round-trips of several tens of meters in search of females. Most excursions end with the spiders returning to their burrow. For small animals homing over distances of several meters is theoretically impossible without the aid of external cues. It was investigated, whether the spiders use local cues or they rely solely on global cues. Individually marked male spiders were captured during their excursions and displaced several meters inside an opaque box. Ten out of twelve displaced spiders returned to their burrows. This shows that the male L. arenicola are using local cues during their homing, as the comparatively small displacement distances could not be detected by means of global, e.g. celestial cues. In order to test whether the spiders could be using olfactory guidance, the burrows were displaced by 2 m while the spiders were out on their journeys. In 12 out of 15 experiments, the spiders did not Wnd their burrows. These results show that the burrows do not function as olfactory beacons for the homing spiders.

Adult male Leucorchestris arenicola can walk round-trips of several tens of meters in search of females. Most excursions end with the spiders returning to their burrow. For small animals homing over distances of several meters is theoretically impossible without the aid of external cues. It was investigated, whether the spiders use local cues or they rely solely on global cues. Individually marked male spiders were captured during their excursions and displaced several meters inside an opaque box. Ten out of twelve displaced spiders returned to their burrows. This shows that the male L. arenicola are using local cues during their homing, as the comparatively small displacement distances could not be detected by means of global, e.g. celestial cues. In order to test whether the spiders could be using olfactory guidance, the burrows were displaced by 2 m while the spiders were out on their journeys. In 12 out of 15 experiments, the spiders did not Wnd their burrows. These results show that the burrows do not function as olfactory beacons for the homing spiders.

Citations

13 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Sparassidae, Homing, External cues, Landmarks, Olfaction
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:13
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-7594
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00359-006-0178-6

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