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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3806

Flückiger, M A; Damur-Djuric, N; Hässig, M; Morgan, J P; Steffen, F (2006). A lumbosacral transitional vertebra in the dog predisposes to cauda equina syndrome. Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, 47(1):39-44.

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Abstract

The association between the occurrence of a lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) and the cauda equina syndrome (CES) in dogs was investigated. In 4000 control dogs without signs of CES, 3.5% had an LTV, while in 92 dogs with CES, 16.3% had an LTV. The lesion causing CES always occurred between the last true lumbar vertebra and the LTV. Dogs with an LTV were eight times more likely to develop CES than dogs without an LTV. German Shepherd dogs were eight times more likely to develop CES compared with other breeds. Male dogs were twice as likely to develop CES than females. Dogs with an LTV develop CES 1-2 years earlier than dogs without an LTV.

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24 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:25 Mar 2009 15:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:28
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1058-8183
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1740-8261.2005.00103.x
PubMed ID:16429983

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