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A 4-wk high-fructose diet alters lipid metabolism without affecting insulin sensitivity or ectopic lipids in healthy humans


Lê, K A; Faeh, D; Stettler, R; Ith, M; Kreis, R; Vermathen, P; Boesch, C; Ravussin, E; Tappy, L (2006). A 4-wk high-fructose diet alters lipid metabolism without affecting insulin sensitivity or ectopic lipids in healthy humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 84(6):1374-1379.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: High fructose consumption is suspected to be causally linked to the epidemics of obesity and metabolic disorders. In rodents, fructose leads to insulin resistance and ectopic lipid deposition. In humans, the effects of fructose on insulin sensitivity remain debated, whereas its effect on ectopic lipids has never been investigated. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the effect of moderate fructose supplementation on insulin sensitivity (IS) and ectopic lipids in healthy male volunteers (n = 7). DESIGN: IS, intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL), and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were measured before and after 1 and 4 wk of a high-fructose diet containing 1.5 g fructose . kg body wt(-1) . d(-1). Adipose tissue IS was evaluated from nonesterified fatty acid suppression, hepatic IS from suppression of hepatic glucose output (6,6-2H2-glucose), and muscle IS from the whole-body glucose disposal rate during a 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. IHCL and IMCL were measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Fructose caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in fasting plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol (36%), VLDL-triacylglycerol (72%), lactate (49%), glucose (5.5%), and leptin (48%) without any significant changes in body weight, IHCL, IMCL, or IS. IHCL were negatively correlated with triacylglycerol after 4 wk of the high-fructose diet (r = -0.78, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Moderate fructose supplementation over 4 wk increases plasma triacylglycerol and glucose concentrations without causing ectopic lipid deposition or insulin resistance in healthy humans.

BACKGROUND: High fructose consumption is suspected to be causally linked to the epidemics of obesity and metabolic disorders. In rodents, fructose leads to insulin resistance and ectopic lipid deposition. In humans, the effects of fructose on insulin sensitivity remain debated, whereas its effect on ectopic lipids has never been investigated. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the effect of moderate fructose supplementation on insulin sensitivity (IS) and ectopic lipids in healthy male volunteers (n = 7). DESIGN: IS, intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL), and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were measured before and after 1 and 4 wk of a high-fructose diet containing 1.5 g fructose . kg body wt(-1) . d(-1). Adipose tissue IS was evaluated from nonesterified fatty acid suppression, hepatic IS from suppression of hepatic glucose output (6,6-2H2-glucose), and muscle IS from the whole-body glucose disposal rate during a 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. IHCL and IMCL were measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Fructose caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in fasting plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol (36%), VLDL-triacylglycerol (72%), lactate (49%), glucose (5.5%), and leptin (48%) without any significant changes in body weight, IHCL, IMCL, or IS. IHCL were negatively correlated with triacylglycerol after 4 wk of the high-fructose diet (r = -0.78, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Moderate fructose supplementation over 4 wk increases plasma triacylglycerol and glucose concentrations without causing ectopic lipid deposition or insulin resistance in healthy humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:18 Feb 2011 11:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:24
Publisher:American Society for Clinical Nutrition
ISSN:0002-9165
Related URLs:http://www.ajcn.org/content/84/6/1374.long (Publisher)
PubMed ID:17158419
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-38386

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