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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3848

Cejka, P; Jiricny, J (2008). Interplay of DNA repair pathways controls methylation damage toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics, 179(4):1835-1844.

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Abstract

Methylating agents of S(N)1 type are widely used in cancer chemotherapy, but their mode of action is poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how the primary cytotoxic lesion, O(6)-methylguanine ((Me)G), causes cell death. One hypothesis stipulates that binding of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins to (Me)G/T mispairs arising during DNA replication triggers cell-cycle arrest and cell death. An alternative hypothesis posits that (Me)G cytotoxicity is linked to futile processing of (Me)G-containing base pairs by the MMR system. In this study, we provide compelling genetic evidence in support of the latter hypothesis. Treatment of 4644 deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the prototypic S(N)1-type methylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) identified MMR as the only pathway that sensitizes cells to MNNG. In contrast, homologous recombination (HR), postreplicative repair, DNA helicases, and chromatin maintenance factors protect yeast cells against the cytotoxicity of this chemical. Notably, DNA damage signaling proteins played a protective rather than sensitizing role in the MNNG response. Taken together, this evidence demonstrates that (Me)G-containing lesions in yeast must be processed to be cytotoxic.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:August 2008
Deposited On:17 Sep 2008 14:39
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 18:01
Publisher:Genetics Society of America
ISSN:0016-6731
Publisher DOI:10.1534/genetics.108.089979
PubMed ID:18579505
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 9
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