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Toward quantitative proteomics of organ substructures: implications for renal physiology


Velic, A; Macek, B; Wagner, C A (2010). Toward quantitative proteomics of organ substructures: implications for renal physiology. Seminars in Nephrology, 30(5):487-499.

Abstract

Organs are complex structures that consist of multiple tissues with different levels of gene expression. To achieve comprehensive coverage and accurate quantitation data, organs ideally should be separated into morphologic and/or functional substructures before gene or protein expression analysis. However, because of complex morphology and elaborate isolation protocols, to date this often has been difficult to achieve. Kidneys are organs in which functional and morphologic subdivision is especially important. Each subunit of the kidney, the nephron, consists of more than 10 subsegments with distinct morphologic and functional characteristics. For a full understanding of kidney physiology, global gene and protein expression analyses have to be performed at the level of the nephron subsegments; however, such studies have been extremely rare to date. Here we describe the latest approaches in quantitative high-accuracy mass spectrometry-based proteomics and their application to quantitative proteomics studies of the whole kidney and nephron subsegments, both in human beings and in animal models. We compare these studies with similar studies performed on other organ substructures. We argue that the newest technologies used for preparation, processing, and measurement of small amounts of starting material are finally enabling global and subsegment-specific quantitative measurement of protein levels in the kidney and other organs. These new technologies and approaches are making a decisive impact on our understanding of the (patho)physiological processes at the molecular level.

Organs are complex structures that consist of multiple tissues with different levels of gene expression. To achieve comprehensive coverage and accurate quantitation data, organs ideally should be separated into morphologic and/or functional substructures before gene or protein expression analysis. However, because of complex morphology and elaborate isolation protocols, to date this often has been difficult to achieve. Kidneys are organs in which functional and morphologic subdivision is especially important. Each subunit of the kidney, the nephron, consists of more than 10 subsegments with distinct morphologic and functional characteristics. For a full understanding of kidney physiology, global gene and protein expression analyses have to be performed at the level of the nephron subsegments; however, such studies have been extremely rare to date. Here we describe the latest approaches in quantitative high-accuracy mass spectrometry-based proteomics and their application to quantitative proteomics studies of the whole kidney and nephron subsegments, both in human beings and in animal models. We compare these studies with similar studies performed on other organ substructures. We argue that the newest technologies used for preparation, processing, and measurement of small amounts of starting material are finally enabling global and subsegment-specific quantitative measurement of protein levels in the kidney and other organs. These new technologies and approaches are making a decisive impact on our understanding of the (patho)physiological processes at the molecular level.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:17 Jan 2011 13:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:24
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0270-9295
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.semnephrol.2010.07.006
PubMed ID:21044760
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-38491

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