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Dynamic effects on the subjective visual vertical after roll rotation


Lorincz, E N; Hess, B J M (2008). Dynamic effects on the subjective visual vertical after roll rotation. Journal of Neurophysiology, 100(2):657-669.

Abstract

We investigated in normal human subjects how semicircular canal and otolith signals interact in the estimation of the subjective visual vertical after constant velocity or constant acceleration roll tilt. In the constant velocity paradigm, subjects were rotated in darkness at +/-60 degrees/s for five complete cycles before being stopped in one of seven orientations ranging from 0 to +/-90 degrees (right/left ear down). In the constant acceleration paradigm, subjects were rotated with an acceleration of +30 or -30 degrees/s2 to the same seven end positions between -90 and +90 degrees , by way of passing once through the upside-down position. The subjective visual vertical was assessed by measuring the setting of a luminous line that appeared at different test delays after stop rotation in otherwise complete darkness. The data suggest that gravitational jerk signals generated by otolith-semicircular canal interactions and/or carried by phasic otolith signals are responsible for the observed transient bias in the estimation of the subjective visual vertical. This transient bias depended on both rotation and tilt direction after constant velocity rotations, but was almost abolished following constant acceleration rotations.

Abstract

We investigated in normal human subjects how semicircular canal and otolith signals interact in the estimation of the subjective visual vertical after constant velocity or constant acceleration roll tilt. In the constant velocity paradigm, subjects were rotated in darkness at +/-60 degrees/s for five complete cycles before being stopped in one of seven orientations ranging from 0 to +/-90 degrees (right/left ear down). In the constant acceleration paradigm, subjects were rotated with an acceleration of +30 or -30 degrees/s2 to the same seven end positions between -90 and +90 degrees , by way of passing once through the upside-down position. The subjective visual vertical was assessed by measuring the setting of a luminous line that appeared at different test delays after stop rotation in otherwise complete darkness. The data suggest that gravitational jerk signals generated by otolith-semicircular canal interactions and/or carried by phasic otolith signals are responsible for the observed transient bias in the estimation of the subjective visual vertical. This transient bias depended on both rotation and tilt direction after constant velocity rotations, but was almost abolished following constant acceleration rotations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Spatial orientation, subjective visual vertical, vestibular, gravity
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:19 Nov 2008 17:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:28
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0022-3077
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.01248.2007
PubMed ID:18497358

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