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Use It and Still Lose It?: The Influence of Age and Job Experience on Detection Performance in X-Ray Screening


Schwaninger, A; Hardmeier, D; Riegelnig, J; Martin, Mike (2010). Use It and Still Lose It?: The Influence of Age and Job Experience on Detection Performance in X-Ray Screening. GeroPsych, 23(3):169-175.

Abstract

In recent years, research on cognitive aging increasingly has focused on the cognitive development across middle adulthood.
However, little is still known about the long-term effects of intensive job-specific training of fluid intellectual abilities. In this study we
examined the effects of age- and job-specific practice of cognitive abilities on detection performance in airport security x-ray screening.
In Experiment 1 (N = 308; 24–65 years), we examined performance in the X-ray Object Recognition Test (ORT), a speeded visual object
recognition task in which participants have to find dangerous items in x-ray images of passenger bags; and in Experiment 2 (N = 155;
20–61 years) in an on-the-job object recognition test frequently used in baggage screening. Results from both experiments show high
performance in older adults and significant negative age correlations that cannot be overcome by more years of job-specific experience.
We discuss the implications of our findings for theories of lifespan cognitive development and training concepts.

In recent years, research on cognitive aging increasingly has focused on the cognitive development across middle adulthood.
However, little is still known about the long-term effects of intensive job-specific training of fluid intellectual abilities. In this study we
examined the effects of age- and job-specific practice of cognitive abilities on detection performance in airport security x-ray screening.
In Experiment 1 (N = 308; 24–65 years), we examined performance in the X-ray Object Recognition Test (ORT), a speeded visual object
recognition task in which participants have to find dangerous items in x-ray images of passenger bags; and in Experiment 2 (N = 155;
20–61 years) in an on-the-job object recognition test frequently used in baggage screening. Results from both experiments show high
performance in older adults and significant negative age correlations that cannot be overcome by more years of job-specific experience.
We discuss the implications of our findings for theories of lifespan cognitive development and training concepts.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:age, working experience, cognitive functions, x-ray screening, detection performance, object recognition
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:24 Nov 2010 09:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:25
Publisher:Hogrefe
ISSN:1662-9647
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1662-9647/a000020

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