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Radiographic evaluation of neonatal skeletal development in Callimico goeldii reveals closer similarity to Callithrix jacchus than to Saguinus oedipus


Hofmann, M; Schradin, C; Geissmann, T (2007). Radiographic evaluation of neonatal skeletal development in Callimico goeldii reveals closer similarity to Callithrix jacchus than to Saguinus oedipus. American Journal of Primatology, 69(4):420-433.

Abstract

The phylogenetic affinities of the neotropical Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) have long been a matter of debate. Whereas most morphological evidence appears to place Callimico in a sister group position relative to the Callitrichidae, genetic studies place C. goeldii within the Callitrichidae and suggest that it is more closely related to marmosets than to tamarins. The present study presents the first radiographic analysis comparing the secondary limb bone ossification of newborn C. goeldii with representatives of the marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and tamarins (Saguinus oedipus). The state of secondary ossification of the epiphysis and short bones is classified into three different ontogenetic stages. Our results reveal that in terms of the number of ossification centers, C. goeldii is significantly closer to C. jacchus than to S. oedipus. This is the first morphological study to support the findings of molecular studies, and the results suggest that C. goeldii is more closely related to marmosets than to tamarins.

The phylogenetic affinities of the neotropical Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) have long been a matter of debate. Whereas most morphological evidence appears to place Callimico in a sister group position relative to the Callitrichidae, genetic studies place C. goeldii within the Callitrichidae and suggest that it is more closely related to marmosets than to tamarins. The present study presents the first radiographic analysis comparing the secondary limb bone ossification of newborn C. goeldii with representatives of the marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and tamarins (Saguinus oedipus). The state of secondary ossification of the epiphysis and short bones is classified into three different ontogenetic stages. Our results reveal that in terms of the number of ossification centers, C. goeldii is significantly closer to C. jacchus than to S. oedipus. This is the first morphological study to support the findings of molecular studies, and the results suggest that C. goeldii is more closely related to marmosets than to tamarins.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Uncontrolled Keywords:ossification centers, radiography, Callitrichidae, Callimico goeldii, Callithrix jacchus, Saguinus oedipus
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0275-2565
Publisher DOI:10.1002/ajp.20361
PubMed ID:17146795

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