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The Sphenoid Sinus Septum Sign - an observation that may help in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma


Bosshart, M. The Sphenoid Sinus Septum Sign - an observation that may help in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma. 2010, Universität Bern, Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Neuroradiologie des Inselspitals Bern, Faculty of Medicine.

Abstract

Purpose: To establish whether the clinical finding of pituitary adenomas´ localization above sphenoid sinus septa is an anecdotal observation or a regular occurence. – – Material and Methods: – Sphenoid sinus septum anatomy was initially studied in 100 consecutive CT exams of the paranasal sinuses. The highly variable anatomy of the septa was classified in three groups: No septum (type I), one medial septum (type II), multiple septa (type III). Next, in pre-operative MR studies of 43 patients with histologically confirmed pituitary microadenoma (? 10 mm), the position of the adenoma relative to the sphenoid sinus septa was analyzed. – – Results: – In 33 of the 43 cases (77%), the adenoma was localized directly above the insertion of a sphenoid sinus septum in the floor of the sella. Type III septum anatomy was by far most common. – – Discussion: – Sphenoid sinus septum anatomy is highly variable. The fact that pituitary microadenomas are located above the insertion of a septum in nearly four fifths of our cases makes this occurence so typical that we named it ´´sphenoid sinus septum sign´´. – Neither anatomy, histology of the pituitary gland and pituitary adenomas, or embryologic development of the sellar region can offer an explanation for this finding.

Purpose: To establish whether the clinical finding of pituitary adenomas´ localization above sphenoid sinus septa is an anecdotal observation or a regular occurence. – – Material and Methods: – Sphenoid sinus septum anatomy was initially studied in 100 consecutive CT exams of the paranasal sinuses. The highly variable anatomy of the septa was classified in three groups: No septum (type I), one medial septum (type II), multiple septa (type III). Next, in pre-operative MR studies of 43 patients with histologically confirmed pituitary microadenoma (? 10 mm), the position of the adenoma relative to the sphenoid sinus septa was analyzed. – – Results: – In 33 of the 43 cases (77%), the adenoma was localized directly above the insertion of a sphenoid sinus septum in the floor of the sella. Type III septum anatomy was by far most common. – – Discussion: – Sphenoid sinus septum anatomy is highly variable. The fact that pituitary microadenomas are located above the insertion of a septum in nearly four fifths of our cases makes this occurence so typical that we named it ´´sphenoid sinus septum sign´´. – Neither anatomy, histology of the pituitary gland and pituitary adenomas, or embryologic development of the sellar region can offer an explanation for this finding.

Additional indexing

Other titles:The Sphenoid Sinus Septum Sign ¿ an observation that may help in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma
Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Ozdoba C
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:03 Jan 2011 14:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:26
Related URLs:http://studmed.unibe.ch/dissdb/index.php?a=n&t=0&v=2010&b=2010&s=Bosshart&o=suchen&f=&k=0 (Organisation)

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