UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Assessment of intraspecific mtDNA variability of European Ixodes ricinus sensu stricto (Acari: Ixodidae)


Casati, S; Bernasconi, Marco V; Gern, L; Piffaretti, J C (2008). Assessment of intraspecific mtDNA variability of European Ixodes ricinus sensu stricto (Acari: Ixodidae). Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 8(2):152-158.

Abstract

The Ixodes ricinus complex is composed of 14 species distributed worldwide. Some members of this complex are involved in the transmission of a number of diseases to animals and humans, in particular Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne encephalitis, ehrlichiosis and babesiosis. While the phylogenetic relationships between species of the I. ricinus complex have been investigated in the past, still little is known about the genetic structure within the species I. ricinus sensu stricto. We have investigated the intraspecific variability among 26 I. ricinus s.s. ticks collected in various European countries, including Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland by using five mitochondrial gene fragments corresponding to the control region, 12S rDNA, cytb, COI, and COII. The five genes considered here showed a low genetic variability (1.6–5%). Our results based on both statistical parsimony (applied to the COI + COII + cytb + 12S + CR data set, for a total of 3423 bp) and maximum parsimony (applied to the COI + COII + cytb + 12S data set, for a total of 2980 bp) did not provide any evidence for a correlation between the identified haplotypes and their geographic origin. Thus, the European I. ricinus s.s. ticks do not seem to show any phylogeography structure.

The Ixodes ricinus complex is composed of 14 species distributed worldwide. Some members of this complex are involved in the transmission of a number of diseases to animals and humans, in particular Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne encephalitis, ehrlichiosis and babesiosis. While the phylogenetic relationships between species of the I. ricinus complex have been investigated in the past, still little is known about the genetic structure within the species I. ricinus sensu stricto. We have investigated the intraspecific variability among 26 I. ricinus s.s. ticks collected in various European countries, including Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland by using five mitochondrial gene fragments corresponding to the control region, 12S rDNA, cytb, COI, and COII. The five genes considered here showed a low genetic variability (1.6–5%). Our results based on both statistical parsimony (applied to the COI + COII + cytb + 12S + CR data set, for a total of 3423 bp) and maximum parsimony (applied to the COI + COII + cytb + 12S data set, for a total of 2980 bp) did not provide any evidence for a correlation between the identified haplotypes and their geographic origin. Thus, the European I. ricinus s.s. ticks do not seem to show any phylogeography structure.

Citations

30 citations in Web of Science®
32 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

65 downloads since deposited on 04 Feb 2009
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:March 2008
Deposited On:04 Feb 2009 15:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1567-1348
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.meegid.2007.11.007
PubMed ID:18206426
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3964

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations