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Metallothionein-3, Zinc, and Copper in the Central Nervous System


Vasak, M; Meloni, G (2009). Metallothionein-3, Zinc, and Copper in the Central Nervous System. In: Sigel, A; Sigel, H; Sigel, R K O. Metallothioneins and Related Chelators. Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry, 319-352.

Abstract

Metallothionein-3 (MT-3), also known as the neuronal growth inhibitory factor, has been discovered by Uchida and coworkers in 1991 in their search for a cellular component responsible for antagonizing aberrant neuritic sprouting and increased survival of cultured neurons stimulated by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain extract. Since this initial
discovery further studies showed that MT-3 possesses peculiar structural and functional properties not shared by other members of the mammalian MT family. Several lines of evidence suggest that the metal-binding protein MT-3 plays a vital role in zinc and copper homeostasis in the brain. Although far from being understood, the unusual structural properties of MT-3 are responsible for its neuronal growth inhibitory activity, involvement in trafficking of zinc vesicles in the CNS, protection against copper-mediated toxicity in AD and in controlling abnormal metal-protein interactions in other neurodegenerative disorders.

Metallothionein-3 (MT-3), also known as the neuronal growth inhibitory factor, has been discovered by Uchida and coworkers in 1991 in their search for a cellular component responsible for antagonizing aberrant neuritic sprouting and increased survival of cultured neurons stimulated by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain extract. Since this initial
discovery further studies showed that MT-3 possesses peculiar structural and functional properties not shared by other members of the mammalian MT family. Several lines of evidence suggest that the metal-binding protein MT-3 plays a vital role in zinc and copper homeostasis in the brain. Although far from being understood, the unusual structural properties of MT-3 are responsible for its neuronal growth inhibitory activity, involvement in trafficking of zinc vesicles in the CNS, protection against copper-mediated toxicity in AD and in controlling abnormal metal-protein interactions in other neurodegenerative disorders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:26 Jan 2009 13:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:28
Publisher:The Royal Society of Chemistry
Series Name:Metal Ions in Life Sciences
Number:5
ISBN:978-1-84755-899-2
Official URL:http://www.rsc.org/Shop/books/2009/9781847558992.asp
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005156476
http://www.springer.com/chemistry/inorganic/book/978-1-84755-899-2 (Publisher)
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3989

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