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Stress, anger, and verbal aggression in intimate relationships: Moderating effects of individual and dyadic coping


Bodenmann, Guy; Meuwly, Nathalie; Bradbury, T N; Gmelch, S; Ledermann, T (2010). Stress, anger, and verbal aggression in intimate relationships: Moderating effects of individual and dyadic coping. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 27(3):408-424.

Abstract

Verbally aggressive exchanges between intimate partners are more likely during times of stress. Therefore, the present study examines (i) whether partners’ proneness to anger mediates the association between stress and verbal aggression and (ii) the degree to which individual and dyadic coping moderate associations among stress, anger, and aggression. Effective individual and dyadic coping reduces the effects of stress on aggression. Moreover, dyadic coping may attenuate associations between stress and both anger and verbal aggression. Individuals reporting adaptive and maladaptive coping typically differed in verbal aggression when stress was low, but not when stress was high. This is consistent with the notion that stressors govern strong negative emotion displayed in marriage. Implications of these findings for interventions that mitigate the effects of stress on relationships are discussed.

Verbally aggressive exchanges between intimate partners are more likely during times of stress. Therefore, the present study examines (i) whether partners’ proneness to anger mediates the association between stress and verbal aggression and (ii) the degree to which individual and dyadic coping moderate associations among stress, anger, and aggression. Effective individual and dyadic coping reduces the effects of stress on aggression. Moreover, dyadic coping may attenuate associations between stress and both anger and verbal aggression. Individuals reporting adaptive and maladaptive coping typically differed in verbal aggression when stress was low, but not when stress was high. This is consistent with the notion that stressors govern strong negative emotion displayed in marriage. Implications of these findings for interventions that mitigate the effects of stress on relationships are discussed.

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22 citations in Web of Science®
34 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:19 Feb 2011 17:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:28
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0265-4075
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0265407510361616
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-40104

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