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The benefit of stress and coping research in couples for couple therapy


Randall, A; Bodenmann, Guy; Molgora, S; Margola, D (2010). The benefit of stress and coping research in couples for couple therapy. In: Cigoli, V; Gennari, M. Close relationships and community psychology: An international perspective. Milano, IT: Franco Angeli, 169-186.

Abstract

Stress and coping are imporant variables in understanding the quality and stability of close relationships. An increased number of approaches in the context of couple therapy and marital distress prevention have focused on these variables in order to gain understanding of the quailty and stabilty of close relationshisps. This review (1) highlights the most important findings on stress and coping in couples are summarized and examined how these findings have already and may further prominently influence couple therapy and prevention, (2) gives an overview of current therapy and prevention approaches that explicitly focus on coping issues and (3) emphasizes why an integration of coping concepts and the work on coping in couple therapy may be beneficial. It is suggested that everyday stress, outside the relationship, is highly predictive of relationship functioning as it may spill over to the relationship and empoisons martial quality. Thus the enhancement of coping, specifically dyadic coping, may be an important focus of couple therapy in an attempt to strengthen resources in couples.

Abstract

Stress and coping are imporant variables in understanding the quality and stability of close relationships. An increased number of approaches in the context of couple therapy and marital distress prevention have focused on these variables in order to gain understanding of the quailty and stabilty of close relationshisps. This review (1) highlights the most important findings on stress and coping in couples are summarized and examined how these findings have already and may further prominently influence couple therapy and prevention, (2) gives an overview of current therapy and prevention approaches that explicitly focus on coping issues and (3) emphasizes why an integration of coping concepts and the work on coping in couple therapy may be beneficial. It is suggested that everyday stress, outside the relationship, is highly predictive of relationship functioning as it may spill over to the relationship and empoisons martial quality. Thus the enhancement of coping, specifically dyadic coping, may be an important focus of couple therapy in an attempt to strengthen resources in couples.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:19 Feb 2011 09:52
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 13:44
Publisher:Franco Angeli
Series Name:Psicologia sociale e psicoterapia della Famiglia
ISBN:978-88-568-2333-2
Additional Information:978-88-568-2333-2 (Print) 978-88-568-2687-6 (Ebook)
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&mode=Advanced&vid=ZAD&vl%28186672378UI0%29=isbn&vl%281UI0%29=contains&vl%28freeText0%29=978-88-568-2333-2
http://www.francoangeli.it/Ricerca/Scheda_Libro.asp?CodiceLibro=1245.36 (Publisher)

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