UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Impacts of CIT: the opportunistic user


Matter, Inu Sarah; Höltschi, Peter; Schwabe, Gerhard (2010). Impacts of CIT: the opportunistic user. In: 5th Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems, Tel-Aviv-Yaffo, Israel, 12 September 2010 - 14 September 2010.

Abstract

Applications that have been a huge success in private collaboration - such as video conferencing, application sharing or social tagging systems -, have been failures in business collaboration. The benefits of Collaborative Information Technology (CIT) have been discussed in research and acknowledged by many companies for quite some time. However, the usage of such technology in business context is still surprisingly low. Explanations have been sought through the investigation of CIT in various settings. These studies have been mostly conducted in the specific context of a single CIT tool and/or task, whereas in some businesses several CIT tools are used concurrently when attempting to achieve a certain goal. In this paper we aim for a more holistic view of CIT usage by relating task, CIT functionality and its impacts. We followed a qualitative approach and conducted 10 semi-structured interviews with team leaders of collocated teams in 10 different companies. Our preliminary results show that this approach has promise to further explain the usage of CIT tools and that CITs are used opportunistically. The employee seems to rather use a few established functionalities for different tasks than substituting functionalities and therefore changing her habit, even though new functionalities might better suit a task at hand.

Applications that have been a huge success in private collaboration - such as video conferencing, application sharing or social tagging systems -, have been failures in business collaboration. The benefits of Collaborative Information Technology (CIT) have been discussed in research and acknowledged by many companies for quite some time. However, the usage of such technology in business context is still surprisingly low. Explanations have been sought through the investigation of CIT in various settings. These studies have been mostly conducted in the specific context of a single CIT tool and/or task, whereas in some businesses several CIT tools are used concurrently when attempting to achieve a certain goal. In this paper we aim for a more holistic view of CIT usage by relating task, CIT functionality and its impacts. We followed a qualitative approach and conducted 10 semi-structured interviews with team leaders of collocated teams in 10 different companies. Our preliminary results show that this approach has promise to further explain the usage of CIT tools and that CITs are used opportunistically. The employee seems to rather use a few established functionalities for different tasks than substituting functionalities and therefore changing her habit, even though new functionalities might better suit a task at hand.

Downloads

57 downloads since deposited on 11 Feb 2011
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:14 September 2010
Deposited On:11 Feb 2011 13:40
Last Modified:08 Sep 2016 06:48
Publisher:AIS Electronic Library (AISeL)
Series Name:MCIS 2010 Proceedings
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://aisel.aisnet.org/mcis2010/59/
Other Identification Number:1442
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-40352

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations