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Occupation and adult onset of rhinitis in the general population


Radon, K; Gerhardinger, U; Schulze, A; Zock, J P; Norback, D; Toren, K; Jarvis, D; Held, L; Heinrich, J; Leynaert, B; Nowak, D; Kogevinas, M (2008). Occupation and adult onset of rhinitis in the general population. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(1):38-43.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Occupational exposures have been associated with an increased risk of new-onset rhinitis in apprentices. However, population-based prospective data are scarce and do not cover new onset of rhinitis later in life. The authors studied the association between occupational exposure and adult onset of rhinitis prospectively. METHODS: The data of 4994 participants (age at follow-up 28-57 years) from 27 centres of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II who were symptom-free at baseline were analysed. As outcome at follow-up self-reported (a) nasal allergies ("allergic rhinitis") and (b) runny, blocked nose for 12 months a year ("perennial rhinitis") were used. Occupational exposures at any time during follow-up were defined by job title. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of allergic rhinitis, perennial rhinitis and both conditions was 12%, 11% and 3%, respectively. Compared to office workers, male medical professionals were at increased risk of new onset of allergic rhinitis (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.4 to 6.4). Odds ratios were reduced in metal workers not involved in metal making or treating (0.3; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.7). For perennial rhinitis ORs were significantly increased in cleaners (1.4; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.1). CONCLUSIONS: Cleaners and medical professionals may be at increased risk for adult-onset rhinitis.

OBJECTIVES: Occupational exposures have been associated with an increased risk of new-onset rhinitis in apprentices. However, population-based prospective data are scarce and do not cover new onset of rhinitis later in life. The authors studied the association between occupational exposure and adult onset of rhinitis prospectively. METHODS: The data of 4994 participants (age at follow-up 28-57 years) from 27 centres of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II who were symptom-free at baseline were analysed. As outcome at follow-up self-reported (a) nasal allergies ("allergic rhinitis") and (b) runny, blocked nose for 12 months a year ("perennial rhinitis") were used. Occupational exposures at any time during follow-up were defined by job title. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of allergic rhinitis, perennial rhinitis and both conditions was 12%, 11% and 3%, respectively. Compared to office workers, male medical professionals were at increased risk of new onset of allergic rhinitis (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.4 to 6.4). Odds ratios were reduced in metal workers not involved in metal making or treating (0.3; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.7). For perennial rhinitis ORs were significantly increased in cleaners (1.4; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.1). CONCLUSIONS: Cleaners and medical professionals may be at increased risk for adult-onset rhinitis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:30 Oct 2008 12:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:29
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1351-0711
Publisher DOI:10.1136/oem.2006.031542
PubMed ID:17664253
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4048

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