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Clinical course of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)


Steinmetz, H W; Rütten, M; Ruess-Melzer, K; Ohlerth, S; Lischer, C J; Oevermann, A; Bode-Lesniewska, B; Hatt, J M (2010). Clinical course of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica). Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, 22(6):970-975.

Abstract

A 14-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was admitted with an ulcerating mass on the right thoracic wall. Radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation indicated 2 isolated cutaneous masses without any signs of metastasis. Histology of a Tru-Cut biopsy revealed an anaplastic sarcoma with giant cells. Both tumors were resected with appropriate normal tissue margins. The size of the defect did not allow primary closure of the wound; therefore, a mesh expansion technique was attempted. Three months later, the tiger had to be euthanized due to extensive metastasis to the lungs. Histomorphological features and immunohistochemical results confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. In contrast to domestic animal experience, the tumor had spread extensively to the lungs without local reccurrence in a short period of time. Correct diagnosis requires various immunohistochemical evaluations of the tumor tissue.

A 14-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was admitted with an ulcerating mass on the right thoracic wall. Radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation indicated 2 isolated cutaneous masses without any signs of metastasis. Histology of a Tru-Cut biopsy revealed an anaplastic sarcoma with giant cells. Both tumors were resected with appropriate normal tissue margins. The size of the defect did not allow primary closure of the wound; therefore, a mesh expansion technique was attempted. Three months later, the tiger had to be euthanized due to extensive metastasis to the lungs. Histomorphological features and immunohistochemical results confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. In contrast to domestic animal experience, the tumor had spread extensively to the lungs without local reccurrence in a short period of time. Correct diagnosis requires various immunohistochemical evaluations of the tumor tissue.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:07 Jan 2011 16:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:31
Publisher:American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians
ISSN:1040-6387
Additional Information:Copyright: American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians
Publisher DOI:10.1177/104063871002200621
PubMed ID:21088186
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-41218

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