UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Colonization and dispersal in a social species, the Bechstein's bat (Myotis bechsteinii).


Kerth, G; Petit, E (2005). Colonization and dispersal in a social species, the Bechstein's bat (Myotis bechsteinii). Molecular Ecology, 14(13):3943-3950.

Abstract

Metapopulation genetic models consider that colonization and dispersal are distinct behaviours. However, whether colonization and dispersal indeed reflect different biological processes in nature is unclear. One possibility to test this assumption is to assess patterns of autosomal and mitochondrial genetic structure in species with strict female philopatry, such as the communally breeding Bechstein's bat. In this species, mitochondrial DNA can spread only when females establish new colonies, and autosomal DNA is transmitted among colonies only when females mate with solitary males born in foreign colonies. Investigating the genetic structure among 37 colonies, we found that autosomal genes followed an island model on a regional scale and a model of isolation by distance on a larger geographical scale. In contrast, mitochondrial genetic structure revealed no pattern of isolation by distance at a large scale but exhibited an effect of ecological barriers on a regional scale. Our results provide strong empirical evidence that colonization and dispersal do not follow the same behavioural rules in this bat, supporting the assumption of metapopulation genetic models.

Metapopulation genetic models consider that colonization and dispersal are distinct behaviours. However, whether colonization and dispersal indeed reflect different biological processes in nature is unclear. One possibility to test this assumption is to assess patterns of autosomal and mitochondrial genetic structure in species with strict female philopatry, such as the communally breeding Bechstein's bat. In this species, mitochondrial DNA can spread only when females establish new colonies, and autosomal DNA is transmitted among colonies only when females mate with solitary males born in foreign colonies. Investigating the genetic structure among 37 colonies, we found that autosomal genes followed an island model on a regional scale and a model of isolation by distance on a larger geographical scale. In contrast, mitochondrial genetic structure revealed no pattern of isolation by distance at a large scale but exhibited an effect of ecological barriers on a regional scale. Our results provide strong empirical evidence that colonization and dispersal do not follow the same behavioural rules in this bat, supporting the assumption of metapopulation genetic models.

Citations

33 citations in Web of Science®
36 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0962-1083
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02719.x
PubMed ID:16262850

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations