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Identification of dark matter particles with LHC and direct detection data


Bertone, G; Cerdeno, D G; Fornasa, M; Ruiz de Austri, R; Trotta, R (2010). Identification of dark matter particles with LHC and direct detection data. Physical Review D, 82(5):055008-7pp.

Abstract

Dark matter (DM) is currently searched for with a variety of detection strategies. Accelerator searches are particularly promising, but even if weakly interacting massive particles are found at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it will be difficult to prove that they constitute the bulk of the DM in the Universe ΩDM. We show that a significantly better reconstruction of the DM properties can be obtained with a combined analysis of LHC and direct detection data, by making a simple Ansatz on the weakly interacting massive particles local density ρχ˜10, i.e., by assuming that the local density scales with the cosmological relic abundance, (ρχ˜10/ρDM)=(Ωχ˜10/ΩDM). We demonstrate this method in an explicit example in the context of a 24-parameter supersymmetric model, with a neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle in the stau coannihilation region. Our results show that future ton-scale direct detection experiments will allow to break degeneracies in the supersymmetric parameter space and achieve a significantly better reconstruction of the neutralino composition and its relic density than with LHC data alone.

Dark matter (DM) is currently searched for with a variety of detection strategies. Accelerator searches are particularly promising, but even if weakly interacting massive particles are found at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it will be difficult to prove that they constitute the bulk of the DM in the Universe ΩDM. We show that a significantly better reconstruction of the DM properties can be obtained with a combined analysis of LHC and direct detection data, by making a simple Ansatz on the weakly interacting massive particles local density ρχ˜10, i.e., by assuming that the local density scales with the cosmological relic abundance, (ρχ˜10/ρDM)=(Ωχ˜10/ΩDM). We demonstrate this method in an explicit example in the context of a 24-parameter supersymmetric model, with a neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle in the stau coannihilation region. Our results show that future ton-scale direct detection experiments will allow to break degeneracies in the supersymmetric parameter space and achieve a significantly better reconstruction of the neutralino composition and its relic density than with LHC data alone.

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37 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:September 2010
Deposited On:01 Mar 2011 08:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:33
Publisher:American Physical Society
ISSN:1550-2368
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.82.055008
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/1005.4280
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-41580

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