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Use of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey to detect a subgroup of fibromyalgia patients with psychological dysfunction


Oswald, J; Salemi, S; Michel, B A; Sprott, H (2008). Use of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey to detect a subgroup of fibromyalgia patients with psychological dysfunction. Clinical Rheumatology, 27(7):919-921.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine the in-depth application of the Short-Form-(SF)-36 Health Survey to score the general well-being in fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) patients. Quality of life was evaluated in 12 patients with FS. With respect to mental well-being (social functioning, role limitation due to emotional health problems, and mental health), two distinguished groups were found concerning psychological functioning. One group (n = 8) demonstrated psychological dysfunction, whereas the other (n = 4) showed normal psychological scores. Physical well-being scores (physical functioning, role limitation due to physical health problems, bodily pain, general health, and vitality) did not differ between FS patients but were altogether below the normal range. Regarding the psychological scores of the two groups of patients, SF-36 can be used to differentiate between patients with and without psychological dysfunction independent of pain. Therefore, we propose that the SF-36 could be of help to provide the most adequate therapy to achieve an optimal outcome in patients with FS and psychological disturbances.

The aim of the present study was to examine the in-depth application of the Short-Form-(SF)-36 Health Survey to score the general well-being in fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) patients. Quality of life was evaluated in 12 patients with FS. With respect to mental well-being (social functioning, role limitation due to emotional health problems, and mental health), two distinguished groups were found concerning psychological functioning. One group (n = 8) demonstrated psychological dysfunction, whereas the other (n = 4) showed normal psychological scores. Physical well-being scores (physical functioning, role limitation due to physical health problems, bodily pain, general health, and vitality) did not differ between FS patients but were altogether below the normal range. Regarding the psychological scores of the two groups of patients, SF-36 can be used to differentiate between patients with and without psychological dysfunction independent of pain. Therefore, we propose that the SF-36 could be of help to provide the most adequate therapy to achieve an optimal outcome in patients with FS and psychological disturbances.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Nov 2008 16:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0770-3198
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10067-008-0874-4
PubMed ID:18379835
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4160

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