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The reproductive success of the parasitic bat fly Basilia nana (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) is affected by the low roost fidelity of its host, the Bechstein's bat (Myotis bechsteinii).


Reckardt, K; Kerth, G (2006). The reproductive success of the parasitic bat fly Basilia nana (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) is affected by the low roost fidelity of its host, the Bechstein's bat (Myotis bechsteinii). Parasitology Research, 98(3):237-243.

Abstract

We studied the reproductive ecology of the bat fly Basilia nana on free-ranging colonial female and solitary male Bechstein's bats (Myotis bechsteinii) during one reproductive season. The reproduction of B. nana took place from April to September, and the production of puparia in bat roosts was high. The metamorphosis of the flies took a minimum of 30 days, and at least 86% of the puparia metamorphosed successfully. However, only about 30% of flies from puparia deposited in female roosts and 57% of flies from puparia deposited in male roosts emerged in the presence of Bechstein's bats and were thus able to survive. The significantly higher emergence success of bat flies in male roosts was caused by the higher roost fidelity of the solitary males compared with the social females. Our results indicate that bats can control the reproductive success of bat flies by switching and selecting roosts.

We studied the reproductive ecology of the bat fly Basilia nana on free-ranging colonial female and solitary male Bechstein's bats (Myotis bechsteinii) during one reproductive season. The reproduction of B. nana took place from April to September, and the production of puparia in bat roosts was high. The metamorphosis of the flies took a minimum of 30 days, and at least 86% of the puparia metamorphosed successfully. However, only about 30% of flies from puparia deposited in female roosts and 57% of flies from puparia deposited in male roosts emerged in the presence of Bechstein's bats and were thus able to survive. The significantly higher emergence success of bat flies in male roosts was caused by the higher roost fidelity of the solitary males compared with the social females. Our results indicate that bats can control the reproductive success of bat flies by switching and selecting roosts.

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30 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0932-0113
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00436-005-0051-5
PubMed ID:16341882

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