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Do echolocation calls of wild colony-living Bechstein’s bats (Myotis bechsteinii) provide individual-specific signatures?


Siemers, B M; Kerth, G (2006). Do echolocation calls of wild colony-living Bechstein’s bats (Myotis bechsteinii) provide individual-specific signatures? Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 59(3):443-454.

Abstract

contain individual signatures. As bats emit
echolocation calls several times per second to orient in space, these might seem ideal candidates for conveying the caller’s individual identity as a free by-product. From a proximate perspective, however, coding of caller identity is hampered by the simple acoustic structure of echolocation signals, by their task-specific design and by propagation loss. We investigated the occurrence of individual signatures in echolocation calls in individually marked, freeliving Bechstein’s bats (Myotis bechsteinii) in a situation with defined social context in the field. The bats belonged to two different colonies, for both of which genetic data on relatedness structure was available. While our data clearly demonstrate situation specificity of call structure, the evidence for individual-specific signatures was relatively
weak. We could not identify a robust and simple paramete that would convey the caller’s identity despite the situationspecific call variability. Discriminant function analysis assigned calls to call sequences with good performance, but
worsened drastically when tested with other sequences from the same bats. Therefore, we caution against concluding from a satisfactory discrimination performance with identical training and test sequences that individual bats can reliably be told apart by echolocation calls. At least the information contained in a single call sequence seems not
to be sufficient for that purpose. Starting frequencies did give the best discrimination between individuals, and it was also this parameter that was correlated with genetic relatedness in one of our two study colonies. Echolocation calls could serve as an additional source of information for individual recognition in Bechstein’s bats societies, while it is unlikely that a large number of individuals could be reliably identified in different situations based on echolocation alone.

contain individual signatures. As bats emit
echolocation calls several times per second to orient in space, these might seem ideal candidates for conveying the caller’s individual identity as a free by-product. From a proximate perspective, however, coding of caller identity is hampered by the simple acoustic structure of echolocation signals, by their task-specific design and by propagation loss. We investigated the occurrence of individual signatures in echolocation calls in individually marked, freeliving Bechstein’s bats (Myotis bechsteinii) in a situation with defined social context in the field. The bats belonged to two different colonies, for both of which genetic data on relatedness structure was available. While our data clearly demonstrate situation specificity of call structure, the evidence for individual-specific signatures was relatively
weak. We could not identify a robust and simple paramete that would convey the caller’s identity despite the situationspecific call variability. Discriminant function analysis assigned calls to call sequences with good performance, but
worsened drastically when tested with other sequences from the same bats. Therefore, we caution against concluding from a satisfactory discrimination performance with identical training and test sequences that individual bats can reliably be told apart by echolocation calls. At least the information contained in a single call sequence seems not
to be sufficient for that purpose. Starting frequencies did give the best discrimination between individuals, and it was also this parameter that was correlated with genetic relatedness in one of our two study colonies. Echolocation calls could serve as an additional source of information for individual recognition in Bechstein’s bats societies, while it is unlikely that a large number of individuals could be reliably identified in different situations based on echolocation alone.

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35 citations in Web of Science®
35 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-5443
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00265-005-0068-x

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